Earth Finds

Earth Finds

Electrical Plaza To Meet Needs Of Traders In Kampala's CBD

Meera Investments, the real estate arm of Ruparelia Group, will soon unveil a new commercial property in the heart of Uganda’s capital Kampala.

Electrical Plaza, located between Market Street and Kiyembe Lane, downtown Kampala, will have 220 shops, 56 apartments and two floors of parking. The structure will cover a total area of 26,469.1m² place centrale.

According to Crane Management Services, another subsidiary of the Ruparelia Group, also the property managers of Electrical Plaza, the property is designed to support the needs of retailers and wholesalers.

Under Meera Investments, Ruparelia Group has been an enabler of small and medium enterprises by providing them with affordable commercial buildings where they set up shops and offices.

Some of the properties set up Ruparelia Group specifically for businesses are Banda Warehouses in Banda, Kingdom Kampala on Nile Avenue, Kampala Boulevard on Kampala Road, The Cube and Crane Plaza in Kisementi – Kamwokya.

Others are Hardware City on Entebbe Road, Hardware Plaza on Entebbe Road, Market Plaza on Market Street, City House and City Plaza on Kampala Road, Royal Plaza on Luwuum Street, The Plaza and Eagle Plaza on Jinja Road, Tourist Plaza near Nakasero Market and Ntinda Warehouse.

Muloni, Katureebe Swear In New Electricity Disputes Tribunal Members

The Electricity Disputes Tribunal (EDT) has been fully constituted by government with as seven-member Tribunal to hear and determine electricity related complaints.

The tribunal led by Charles Okoth Owor as chairman, and Mr. Anaclet Turyakira as his vice was established by the Electricity Act in 1999 after the liberalistion of the power sector and been operating with only three members since 2006.

Following the death of one of the members, Eng. Moses Musaazi in 2018, the Tribunal has lacked the requisite quorum of three members, to effectively and efficiently carry out its statutory mandate.

Eng. Irene Muloni, the Minister of Energy and Mineral Development on Thursday 15th August 2019, presented the five new and additional members before the Chief Justice, Hon. Justice Bart katureebe to take oath before embarking on their new appointments.

The new members are Eng. Dr Terry Kahuma, Mr Judy Mike Mudoma , Ms Harriet Wanyoto, Mrs Christine Muhindo and Eng Paul Mubiru.

Chief Justice Bart Katureebe welcomed the move to have a fully constituted EDT insisting that a growing economy generates a myriad of business disputes, which may require such specialized tribunals.

“To facilitate a fast, and efficient resolution of industry related disputes, we need such tribunals. Unresolved disputes lead to long delays in growth as business comes to a standstill awaiting justice”, said Justice Katureeba.

Justice Katureeba added that about 3-4 trillion shillings is tied up in the commercial court due to unresolved disputes. He said such Tribunals are needed in the entire country not only to speed up justice but to also facilitate business and growth.

Mr. Charles Okoth Owor, the chairperson EDT said the demise of their colleague in 2018 had negatively impacted the ability of the Tribunal to function.

“We are pleased to have new members to the tribunal. The EDT can now resume work on the backlog of complaints that have accumulated overtime since we lost our colleague Eng. Dr Musaazi”, said Okoth Owor.

The EDT is mandated to hear and determine all electricity related disputes that are referred to it except criminal cases. The EDT has all powers of the High Court in the exercise of its jurisdiction.

Rajiv Wins Auto Cross Rally In Kapeeka

Rajiv Ruparelia Rally Team is a happy jubilating camp after their racer Rajiv Ruparelia yet again proved that he didn’t come into the motor rally to make up numbers.

Reports that arrived from Kapeeka indicated that the young businessman dominated and won the Auto Cross Rally in Kapeeka on Sunday.

This becomes his second sweet win ever since he joined the motor rally fraternity early this year in May. His first win came in at the prestigious Federation of Motorsport Clubs of Uganda (FMU) 2019 Autocross event in Kayunga.

The victory in Kayunga came on his second competitive outing having came second on his debut race at Enduro Autocross Championship 2019 at Zion Estates in Ssisa.

Rajiv Ruparelia Rally Team nicknamed Double Trouble cruises in a VW Polo Proto imported from Poland. Rajiv is navigated by Ronnie Walia and managed by Dipu Ruparelia while Mike Mwangi is the Chief Mechanic.

How Many Reports Will It Take To Start Acting On Climate Change?

By John Leary

Farmers feed the world. But they're doing it wrong – rather, big agribusiness is conditioning them to do it wrong. Farming methods are destroying the planet and leaving most smallholder farmers destitute.

On the deteriorating farmlands of Sub-Saharan Africa, I've seen mothers, fathers, and children work long, back-breaking hours on their small plots of maize, soy, cotton, rice and peanuts. And it pains me to know their hard work will ultimately prove futile. 

The widespread use of monocrop agriculture is obliterating the potential of farmlands around the globe and leaving a wake of environmental, social and economic ruin in its path. Deforestation done in the name of "feeding the world" is causing a breakdown in biodiversity and carbon stores, making it harder to grow food and contributing to a warming planet. 

I am not surprised by the findings of several major reports from the scientific community this past year. The UN has warned that immediate change is necessary to avoid more catastrophes; the UN-backed report in May announced that one million species are at risk of extinction because of land degradation; and last week the IPCC Special Report on Climate Change reported exactly what I wrote in One Shot: Trees as our last chance for survival two and a half years ago, that we must change the way we grow food. We must replace chemical fertilizers and processed animal feeds with trees that fertilize and grow food. We must diversify, not intensify. This way, we can bring agriculture closer to sustainability. 

These reports come from accredited institutions and offer real, scientific proof that our planet is in trouble and much of the problem is directly tied to farming and deforestation. While I am not surprised by what these scientists are saying, I am amazed at how the headlines convey this as a new realization, and that the fleeting concern they create still does not inspire people to action. 

Throughout the world, more and more monocropped fields are grown mostly for livestock feed. We're mowing down trees to grow food for our food, and both the fertilizers for the feed and the manure from the livestock are having negative effects on soil, water, and the climate.

For thirty years, Trees for the Future has championed the power of trees, agroforestry, and crop diversity. And for three decades, we've acted on that knowledge. We've transformed smallholder farming with the Forest Garden Approach – a methodology that guides farmers in strategically planting thousands of trees, shrubs, fruits, and vegetables. We're combining our agroforestry and permaculture expertise with farmers' knowledge and experience, and we have created a new form of agriculture that meets humanity's needs now and into the future.

In 30 years we've planted more than 160 million trees and we expect to add over 20 million more trees this year alone. We have proven that maintaining tree cover around our planet and across our agricultural lands is absolutely essential for our long term survival.

When trees flourish, so do communities. Farmers can feed their families healthy produce, send their children to school, and live fulfilling lives. All the while, these trees are sequestering carbon and revitalizing ecosystems.

So let me ask, how many more reports do you need to see before you act?

Trees for the Future has the solution and we are actively working with passionate and dedicated farmers to make the changes we need to see in our food system. 

It's time to start changing at every level. I challenge you to grow your own food, eat locally, reduce your meat consumption, and support organizations that aren't just talking about the problem, but that are doing something that affects sustainable change.

Our community of individual donors, business partners, and collaborating organizations has made the last 30 years possible. Their confidence in us has been a never-ending source of inspiration for our team to dig deeper and work harder, just like the farmers we serve. I thank each and every one of you.

Together, we enter the UN Decade of Landscape Restoration with all the right knowledge to make the meaningful global change we know is possible. Our sustainable and regenerative Forest Garden Approach is attracting more partners every day.

As we work closely with farmers on their land, we also share our Forest Garden Approach with the public, giving anyone with the will to learn the ability to plant their own Forest Gardens. 

Unfortunately, we still have to turn away farmers interested in our program because we don't have the resources to take them on. But you can change that. You can make it possible for us to say "Yes, let's get planting!"

John Leary is the Executive Director of Trees for the Future

Subscribe to this RSS feed

Kampala