Earth Finds

Earth Finds

These Are Top Sailing Spots Around Africa

Sailing is when you employ the wind to propel, a boat or any other vessel on the surface of a big water body. The activity has been adopted as a sport for centuries although mostly in European countries and it is gradually picking up in some African countries.

There are so many wonderful destinations in Africa to go sailing, given that the continent is blessed with several big water bodies. Remember to get permission from the concerned authorities to go sailing in any of the different places. Every country has its own laws and of course, for your own safety. 

River Nile Uganda

From the source of the Nile to the peak of the murchison falls in Uganda, the river creates a great sailing opportunity filled with bird watching and beautiful views. Away from the many falls created by the heavy rock formation through many parts of the river, there are many sections that will not give you a hard time. 

Lake Tanganyika

What’s better than cruising on the deepest lake in the world? The lake goes through four countries: Zambia, Tanzania, Burundi, and the DRC with Tanzania having the biggest potion. The lake is under a joint governing body called the Lake Tanganyika Authority with reps from each country and you get to sail on the historical MV Liemba, a ferry that has been on the waters for decades. 

Cape Verde

Sail to the wild side through the 25 Cape Verdean islands and learn something new about the fauna and flora on the gem of the continent. You choose to sail through the Eastern sandy beaches or the the volcanic coastline on the west. There are nine out of the 25 islands that people live on so you will find restaurants to enjoy the local cuisine while you sail by. 

East African Coast

Sail across from Somalia on a yacht or cruise ship to the beautiful Zanzibar. When close to the shoreline you can hire out a rustic dhow and sail along the beautiful sandy beaches. Dine at some of the restaurants at the coast and enjoy some delicious swahili cuisines. 

Seychelles

One of the most beautiful locations is also the most eligible for sailing, you get a chance to hop through the 115 islands and enjoy the sights and sounds of  the Seychelles. 

Lake Victoria

Maybe not many people in East Africa use the vast water body for sporting but with the right vessel sailing on the Victoria would be fun. The lake is gifted with many bird species so you can as well use that time to bird watch as well as track marine life. There is a sailing club in Entebbe which has sail boats for hire and if that’s not for you, try the canoes or ferries that take people to the islands daily. 

South Africa

With the biggest parts of the country’s borders in the ocean, South Africa is an ideal vacation spot as well as sailing haven. You can charter a luxury cruise of maybe get a sail boat close to the shores and breeze through the waters while watching the beautiful sunset. 

Credit: travel.jumia.com

A Week Through Kampala’s Favourite Restaurants

Kampala is the capital city of Uganda, the “Pearl of Africa.” Uganda has many delicious cuisines many of which represent the tribes and cultures served across the country.

Kampala being the capital city and central business hub of the country, has a vast array of restaurants that boost of delicious food with cuisines from all the major cultures of the world. Take a week and visit are a few of these favourite restaurants around Kampala

Bon Appetite

There are many local food eateries around Kampala that cater to the needs of many Ugandans and have stood the test of time but Bon Appetit's still stands out. The restaurant which has been in business for decades still boosts of big crowds during rush- hour; lunch and breakfast. Their katogo is one of the most ordered on Jumia food. The local food menu is available throughout the day just to keep your tummy happy and healthy. 

Cafe Javas

Recently adding an eighth installation of restaurant branches to its portfolio, Cafe Javas holds the top spot for being one of the most frequented eateries in town. The restaurant chain started out as an extension to City Oil petrol stations and has grown into a formidable brand name in the country. Javas serves a variety of cuisines ranging from Indian, European to Ugandan. Drop in for their “big breakfast” combos. All their restaurants adhere to Halal standards set by the Uganda Muslim Council. 

Legends Bar Kampala

Before it was Legends, the bar and restaurant had the rugby crowds thundering loud on the weekends whenever there was a game. Now, Legends thunders with rugby, pulsates with music and serves sumptuous buffets at lunch time. The buffet menu served is local food that changes everyday of the week so as to give your palate a tour of Ugandan dishes. And then when you are done partying through the night, you can try the delicious roasted meats from the grill. 

Chok Di Thai

A little taste of Thailand in Uganda on a cold evening after a long day at work is all you need. Located alongside Moyo close in Kampala, Chok Di Thai opened for business in 2014 and has been serving up delicious Thai cuisines since then. Try the curry or stir fries they might keep you going back. 

Nanjing Restaurant

Chinese cuisines vary in tastes and style of cooking and Nanjing has done well in showcasing what he Republic offers. Nanjing has two branches all easily to access in the Kololo neighbourhood with a view to behold as you dine. 

Bufundas

These are several hidden restaurants around Kampala serving some of the best local food dishes at the cheapest prices. Bufundas is plural for kafunda which can be loosely translated to meaning a makeshift restaurant. They are usually located downtown, construction sites or washing lots around Kampala. Servings in bufundas are sufficient enough to keep you coming back, that is why most people leave their offices at lunch for those sumptuous meals. 

Mythos Greek Taverna

A unique and quite rare dining experience is what Mythos as it's commonly known offers you delicious greek food and tailored cocktails from the in-house mixologist. Mythos has been in business since 2014, the thoughtfulness that went in the interior design makes you appreciate the beauty of greek architecture in the restaurant. Their best moments are during the dinner rush and lest we forget, sundays with the sumptuous Congolese buffet. 

Khana Khazana

Indian food is world reknown to be full of delicious flavours and you will find it all at Khana Khazana located alongside Acacia Avenue. When at Khana Khazana make sure to ask for their signature dish; Khazana chicken curry with naan/bread/ rice. 

Yujo Sushi Bar and Izakaya

Sushi is not just a trend, sushi is part of the traditions and culture of the Japanese people. Yujo Izakaya has a sushi bar where the chef prepares for you delicious sushi bites as you sip on Sake (rice wine). And if Sushi is not your cup of tea, the hot kitchen will entice you with flavours that will take you to the hills and valleys of Japan. Yujo Izakaya is a traditional Japanese restaurant and tavern. 

Holy Crepe

How about breakfast with a view of  Kololo and Naguru? Holy Crepe is a creperie that serves you delicious waffles, fried chicken and crepes. The breeze in Kololo will calm your spirits, as you sip on fresh juice made from fruits grown in Uganda as you wait for your meal. 

Credit: travel.jumia.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why Seychelles Should Be Your Next Destination

The Seychelles is an island country in the Indian Ocean off the shores of East Africa. The country is made up of 115 islands which are some of the most sought after tourist destinations in Africa. Seychelles was colonised by the British and attained independence in 1976 from which it has grown to having a high nominal per capita GDP. The capital of Seychelles is Victoria, and the biggest population in the country speaks Seychellois Creole while the rest speaks English or French.

A Ugandan does not need a visa to visit the archipelago and contrary to common belief, you do not have to spend a fortune to visit Seychelles. So why should you visit Seychelles in the first place? 

Guaranteed Relaxation

Every thought of sipping pina coladas on the shores of sky blue water while the wind sways the palm trees nearby conjures up the feeling of relaxation. Seychelles is the perfect picture for relaxation and why not use your vacation time to rest away? 

Safety

Seychelles a relatively peaceful country without conflicts. Being a highly desired vacation destination, you do not have to worry about something abrupt happening to you whilst on your visit there. 

Marine Life

Being located in the indian ocean, the Seychelles islands have unique marine life and fauna to be explored, go scuba diving and snorkeling in the coral-filled waters. You will see animals indigenous to the area such as the Aldabra giant tortoise, saltwater crocodile among many more. 

Year Round Vacation

Seychelles has a conducive year round weather which makes it very suitable as a vacation destination throughout the year. Being located in the latitude, the weather varies from rainy and beautifully sunny year round meaning you do not have to stay indoors when you visit. 

What to do in Seychelles

Of course visiting a new country can be very daunting, so here are a few things you can do whilst visiting the Seychelles. 

Go Island Hopping

Why visit Seychelles and stay on one island yet you can go see what the other islands can offer you? Being that the country is an archipelago, there are 115 islands filled with a lot of adventure for you to explore from La Digue to Cerf or maybe Mahe. Yes, you cannot explore all the islands but you can create time for the nearest few. 

Bird Watching

Although the number of bird species has reduced since human settlement on the island around 1770, Seychelles still has the biggest population of sea bird colonies. As of 2016, the recorded number of species is estimated at 269 including Skuas, jaegers, siskins, storks, flamingos, shearwaters, and Acrocephalid warblers. 

Taste The Seychellois Cuisine

The creole culinary experience in Seychelles will blow you away, so when you visit make sure to try out the local eateries for the food. Dishes are mixture of Asian, British, African, and French which gives you a fusion of different cultures on a plate. The food is mostly seafood and fish based with delicious dishes like; salted fish rougay, grilled fish, ladob, shark chutney, Cari bernique and lots of curry. 

Visit Historical Sites

Every country has those locations that played a part in the history of the people and of course Seychelles has several of those. Make time for them and learn something about the history of the Seychellois people. 

Snorkeling And Scuba Diving

The best way to get a good glimpse of what those beautiful blue waters of the Indian ocean hide underneath is by going under the waves. Snorkeling is the practice of swimming on or through a body of water while equipped with a diving mask, a shaped breathing tube called a snorkel, and usually swimfins. On the other hand, Scuba diving involves having a gas tank as well as wearing wet suits. Whatever is convenient for your experience, do it. 

Credit: travel.jumia.com

 

 

 

Geodata Gap Hindering Natural Resources Boom

Experts in Africa’s natural resource extraction business have decried the lack of geodata as one setback curtailing policy formulation and investment deployment despite availability of evidence that the continent is home to numerous wealth minerals. 

Therefore stakeholders from across Africa in order to examine innovative ways within which geodata (geoscientific data) can be generated, managed and used to contribute to social and economic structural transformation, wealth creation, and poverty reduction recently met on Friday, March 24, 2017 at Imperial Resort Beach Hotel, Entebbe, Uganda.

The two-day workshop was organized by the African Union Commission (AUC) in partnership with the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the Uganda Chamber of Mines and Petroleum (UCMP) under the theme: “A New Beginning: A collaborative partnering approach towards African Geodata”.

“While Africa has always been endowed with rich natural resources, the continent has not fully benefited from them due to an assortment of factors. One of the major holdbacks is the limited availability of geodata to guide policy and investment,” noted Hon Richard Kaijuka, the Vice President of the Uganda Chamber of Mines and Petroleum.

Frank Mugyenyi, Senior Industry Advisor for the Department of Trade and Industry at the AUC, explained that making geodata readily available and accessible to government, industry and other stakeholders not only enables effective decision-making but helps create more value and generate more revenues, along the minerals’ value chain.

“According to the Africa Mining Vision, the Africa Union Commission recognizes that geodata provides a foundation to facilitate inclusive and sustainable economic growth by stimulating industrial and inward investment”, he emphasized.

He however, pointed out that exploration is a complex, risky and highly costly venture that requires a multi-stakeholder collaboration and coordination, hence the need to build confidence and enhance trust between the public and private sector in order to attract investment.

The workshop theme was guided by the aspirations of the Agenda 2063, the principles of the Africa Mining Vision and within the framework of Africa Minerals Governance Framework.

The workshop attracted key stakeholders from across Africa in order to examine innovative ways within which geodata (geoscientific data) can be generated, managed and used to contribute to social and economic structural transformation, wealth creation, and poverty reduction.

The geodata gap has influenced African Union Commission to initiate this geodata compiling effort. The Africa Mining Vision (AMV) which is a flagship of the Agenda 2063 recognizes resources’ geodata as an imperative for countries to strengthen their positions when negotiating complex agreements in extractives, agriculture, forestry, fisheries, infrastructure and tourism sector.

Studies have shown that, with geodata, returns on investments in exploration in Africa could result in a multiplier effect of 1:20. This means that for every investment of $1 in exploration, the country will generate $20 in returns across the broader economy.

The workshop tried to find concrete solutions to Africa’s geodata shortfalls and drew expert participants from member states and institutions across Africa, Britain and Canada.

Discussions were centered on: Data requirements, Data Management and Technology Innovation, a business case for a public-spirited partnership (PPP) Model and Capacity Building.

The key outcome of the workshop was an agreement on a regional pilot project for the Eastern African region with the portal to be hosted by Uganda. The pilot project which will be under the auspices of AUC will be conducted in a collaborative partnership between the British Geological Survey (BGS), Geosoft of Canada with the Uganda Geological Survey and the Uganda Chamber of Mines and Petroleum.

This will be based on a Public Private Partnership (PPP) Business Model for generating, management and ownership of geodata by participating countries and it's expected to be piloted in other African countries.

Experts in Africa’s natural resource extraction business have decried the lack of geodata as one setback curtailing policy formulation and investment deployment despite availability of evidence that the continent is home to numerous wealth minerals. 

Therefore stakeholders from across Africa in order to examine innovative ways within which geodata (geoscientific data) can be generated, managed and used to contribute to social and economic structural transformation, wealth creation, and poverty reduction recently met on Friday, March 24, 2017 at Imperial Resort Beach Hotel, Entebbe, Uganda.

The two-day workshop was organized by the African Union Commission (AUC) in partnership with the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the Uganda Chamber of Mines and Petroleum (UCMP) under the theme: “A New Beginning: A collaborative partnering approach towards African Geodata”.

“While Africa has always been endowed with rich natural resources, the continent has not fully benefited from them due to an assortment of factors. One of the major holdbacks is the limited availability of geodata to guide policy and investment,” noted Hon Richard Kaijuka, the Vice President of the Uganda Chamber of Mines and Petroleum.

Frank Mugyenyi, Senior Industry Advisor for the Department of Trade and Industry at the AUC, explained that making geodata readily available and accessible to government, industry and other stakeholders not only enables effective decision-making but helps create more value and generate more revenues, along the minerals’ value chain.

“According to the Africa Mining Vision, the Africa Union Commission recognizes that geodata provides a foundation to facilitate inclusive and sustainable economic growth by stimulating industrial and inward investment”, he emphasized.

He however, pointed out that exploration is a complex, risky and highly costly venture that requires a multi-stakeholder collaboration and coordination, hence the need to build confidence and enhance trust between the public and private sector in order to attract investment.

The workshop theme was guided by the aspirations of the Agenda 2063, the principles of the Africa Mining Vision and within the framework of Africa Minerals Governance Framework.

The workshop attracted key stakeholders from across Africa in order to examine innovative ways within which geodata (geoscientific data) can be generated, managed and used to contribute to social and economic structural transformation, wealth creation, and poverty reduction.

The geodata gap has influenced African Union Commission to initiate this geodata compiling effort. The Africa Mining Vision (AMV) which is a flagship of the Agenda 2063 recognizes resources’ geodata as an imperative for countries to strengthen their positions when negotiating complex agreements in extractives, agriculture, forestry, fisheries, infrastructure and tourism sector.

Studies have shown that, with geodata, returns on investments in exploration in Africa could result in a multiplier effect of 1:20. This means that for every investment of $1 in exploration, the country will generate $20 in returns across the broader economy.

The workshop tried to find concrete solutions to Africa’s geodata shortfalls and drew expert participants from member states and institutions across Africa, Britain and Canada.

Discussions were centered on: Data requirements, Data Management and Technology Innovation, a business case for a public-spirited partnership (PPP) Model and Capacity Building.

The key outcome of the workshop was an agreement on a regional pilot project for the Eastern African region with the portal to be hosted by Uganda. The pilot project which will be under the auspices of AUC will be conducted in a collaborative partnership between the British Geological Survey (BGS), Geosoft of Canada with the Uganda Geological Survey and the Uganda Chamber of Mines and Petroleum.

This will be based on a Public Private Partnership (PPP) Business Model for generating, management and ownership of geodata by participating countries and it's expected to be piloted in other African countries.

Subscribe to this RSS feed

26°C

Kampala

Mostly Cloudy

Humidity: 74%

Wind: 22.53 km/h

  • 24 Mar 2016 28°C 22°C
  • 25 Mar 2016 28°C 21°C