Students Must Have Resilience To Overcome Learning Obstacles – KISU

An education expert at Kampala International School Uganda (KISU) has advised that students must be resilient when tackling obstacles that stand in their way of education.

Steve Lang, the school director at KISU while addressing the school’s open day gathering explained that young learners are faced with many challenges, which, together with teachers, must be able to solve.

Sudhir Ruparelia the proprietor of the school admiring one of the art pieces made by students

He further explained that KISU is working towards producing self-reliant and self-motivated students so that they are competitive in the employment sphere. “We want them to be thoughtful and analytical. We want them to understand issues by asking their teachers why and how other than just what.” Lang explained.

He stated that KISU, a leading international school strives to ensure that students are active learners, self-motivated and that they engage themselves in their own learning process. “We must do all that we can to ensure they have the best chance of succeeding in this context.” Lang said.

Sudhir Ruparelia the proprietor of KISU attended the event

At the school’s open day, students exhibited their school work, finished art and crafts pieces, paintings, fabrics, music and dance while parents and other guests were treated to a sumptuous meal and a variety of drinks.

The school is owned by the Ruparelia Group headed by businessman Sudhir Ruparelia. The group has other schools including Delhi International Public School, Kampala Parents School and Victoria University Kampala. Kampala International School is home to about 600 students from 60 nationalities.

It was established in 1993 with a population of 67 students. It has sections of pre-primary, primary and secondary. It offers international curriculums including the National Curriculum of England and Wales.

Uganda’s Emerging Fossil-Fuel Industry At Cross-Roads

Uganda doesn't spring to mind for most people when coming up with a list of the world's oil-producing nations. But, in fact, 10 years ago more than two billions of barrels worth of oil were discovered in the landlocked nation, where nearly 40% of the population lives on less than $1.25 a day.

Since the oil discovery, many Ugandans have made the connection between oil, government revenues and how it has the potential to improve their lives, and that of the poor service delivery in much of rural Uganda. To them, oil is seen as a cash cow to save Uganda from its worst demons.

But it’s a connection that is over rated. Reports on ground indicate complete absence of corporate social responsibility on the part of contracted oil companies drilling the resource. The locals, and in particular those whose existence depends on local lakes and rivers, have suffered a lot.

Many local residents have been displaced from their land with little or no compensation. Most of them have been deriving their livelihood from fishing and farming. They are poor, but rather than benefitting from the discovery of oil near their homes, their source of survival hangs in balance. Where others see business opportunities, these locals see themselves as losers.

With countries like Tanzania and Mozambique home to major new oil and gas reserves, the prospect of massive new investments in Uganda's energy sector has sparked debate between those who say the country has a right to use whatever resources it has and those who are pushing it to avoid high emissions growth for the sake of the planet.

Climate change should caution us about the dangers of the conventional economic idea that any kind of economic growth is good. It is ironic that, as the developed world rings in the end of fossil fuel era, Uganda is poised to begin it. It is, of course, about economic growth, development and money.

The author of this article Henry Otafiire is passionate about writing on climate change. He has participated in a global writing movement of young people calling for an end to fossil fuels under the campaign break free from fossil fuels.

Uganda, like many African oil producing countries has been given a pass when it comes to greenhouse gas emissions. In international climate talks, the “politically correct” stance has been that, first developing countries did not cause this mess; second, they need to focus on building out energy access to their populations; and third, their poor are most vulnerable to the vagaries of climate change. So, as the ‘’victim’’, Uganda just like other African countries should be given free rein to grow carbon use.

Uganda is looking to build an oil refinery and huge oil pipeline from albertine region to Indian Ocean coast. This appetite to extract oil is driven by deeply entrenched local and international business entities with little regard for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), global carbon budgets and most importantly recently adopted COP 21 Paris agreement which calls for transition from fossil fuels to clean and renewable energy. Of course one has to wonder as this seems to be a dangerous energy path for the country.

So like many developing countries, Uganda faces two possible development pathways: one driven principally by renewable energy, or one pulled by the temptation of fossil fuels: oil and gas. The idea of infinite economic growth, which proves so attractive to economists, investors and financiers. It is premised on the assumption that there is an infinite supply of earth’s goods, and this leads to the planet being exploited beyond the point it can replenish itself.

On the other hand, the shift to renewable energy resonates with a sustainable mode of economic thinking. It should teach Uganda a lesson that oil and gas reserves will create short-term booms, but these can collapse as many oil-producing countries are discovering in the face of plummeting oil prices.

Of course, if we consider how developed countries have attained their development through the use of fossil fuels, oil and gas development may seem an automatic path to go for Uganda too. However, this assumption teaches a simple lesson but which is fundamental. We need to debunk the myth Ugandans are holding that becoming an oil producing nation guarantees a rocket ride to a modern future.

Our country must commit itself to international legally binding Paris accord which calls for real action to drastically reduce global greenhouse gas emissions and transition to clean and renewable energy by 2050.

This article was written by 

Modernizing Agriculture Is A Big Challenge – Bank of Uganda

Uganda is largely an agricultural country however modernisation of agriculture is probably the most important developmental challenge facing Uganda, Bank of Uganda reveals. The central bank also warns that without agricultural modernisation it is very difficult to envisage how Uganda’s economy will ever be able to achieve middle income status.

The revelation was made by Dr Louis Kasekende, Deputy Governor Bank of Uganda at the High-Level Meeting on Developing Approaches for Financing Smallholder households in Uganda organised by Uganda Agribusiness Alliance.

The meeting discussed the Topic: Shaping the Future of Smallholder financing in Uganda. Below is the speech made by the deputy governor at the meeting which took place at Protea Hotel in Kampala on Wednesday April 20, 2016.

The vast majority of farmers in Uganda are smallholders and produce almost all of the country’s agricultural output. “Ninety six percent of total farm output in Uganda is produced on farms of five hectares or less in size. There is no feasible route to agricultural modernisation which does not place the smallholder at its centre. 

Although Ugandans often perceive themselves as “blessed by nature”, our agricultural performance has been poor for several decades. Aggregate output growth has been weak and the growth that has occurred has largely been the result of increases in land acreage under cultivation and increases in the agricultural labour force.

Dr Louis Kasekende, Deputy Governor Bank of Uganda

Both average land and labour productivity have been stagnant for decades. The 2012/13 Uganda National Household Survey indicated that two thirds of farmers are classified as subsistence farmers. An earlier survey found that even the most commercialised quintile of farmers marketed only fifty percent of their output.

Modernising smallholder agriculture in Uganda will require helping farmers to improve their farm practises, utilise more modern farm inputs, especially high yield variety (HYV) seeds and produce more output for the market, thereby raising yields per acre and labour productivity.

We know, from the work done on demonstration plots supported by development agencies that farmers can, in principle, achieve large increases in their crop yields even with relatively low input technologies combined with the adoption of good agricultural practises. Ugandan smallholder farming has the potential for transformation but the constraints to this transformation are both large and multifaceted.

A lack of access to finance by smallholders is one of these constraints, although not necessarily the most binding constraint for the majority of smallholder farmers at this early stage of agricultural development. To tackle the multiple constraints to the modernisation of smallholder agriculture, we need to adopt, and persevere with, a holistic long term approach. Such an approach should have four key components.

The first, and probably most important in the early stages of agricultural development, is to provide agricultural extension services which can reach the majority of smallholders throughout the countryside and provide advice on the adoption of good agricultural practises and the optimal crops to be grown, given the characteristics of their farms, as well as post harvest handling and storage.

Agricultural extension services must be supported by good agricultural research. Both agricultural extension and agricultural research have the characteristics of public goods, because the dissemination of agricultural knowledge from one farmer to another means that social benefits exceed private benefits. Hence they should be subsidised through the Government budget.

The second component of a holistic agricultural strategy should be to strengthen land rights. As in many African countries, land tenure systems in Uganda are often complex and the ownership or usufruct rights of farmers are often unclear and insecure.

This deters farmers from making long term investments in land improvements and it is also an impediment to access to formal sector credit, because land with unclear ownership is not suitable for loan collateral.

The third component is better rural infrastructure, especially rural feeder roads. The commercialization of farming is impeded by the high costs of transporting farm inputs and outputs, from farm gate to and from the market, because of poor roads.

High transport costs drive down farm gate prices of farm output and drive up input prices, which undermine the commercial viability of farming. More public investment in the construction and proper maintenance of rural feeder roads is essential to support the modernisation of smallholder agriculture.

The fourth component is improved access to finance. As I noted earlier, this may not be the binding constraint for many smallholders, especially subsistence farmers. Access to finance will only benefit those farmers who have the knowledge and capacity to use purchased farm inputs to raise their productivity in a manner which generates profits and which does not expose them to a potentially ruinous level of risk.

This probably currently applies to only a minority of smallholders in the country, although the number of smallholders who could benefit from finance should rise substantially if the other constraints to agricultural modernization are effectively tackled.

In formulating policies for the development of agricultural finance best suited to support the modernisation of smallholder farming, it is necessary to address two important questions: what specific type of financial services do smallholder farmers need? And what types of financial institutions are most appropriate for delivering these services? A third important question is whether the provision of finance to smallholders warrants any form of public subsidy. I will not attempt to provide comprehensive answers to these questions but I will offer some thoughts on them.   

Smallholder farmers will probably need a range of financial services, beyond the provision of credit, to support their efforts to modernise. These services will include savings and probably insurance products. The latter are especially important to mitigate the risks that arise from possible crop failures and the volatility of farm gate prices, which are a deterrent to commercialisation.  

I don’t think it is likely that commercial banks will be the main vehicle for providing financial services to smallholder farmers, because the banks’ business models entail transactions costs which are too high to make serving customers with micro-savings and micro-loans commercially viable.

Instead other types of financial institutions which can access customers at lower cost and develop lending models which can mitigate the risks of lending to customers with little formal collateral are more suited to providing financial services to the smallholder sector. These institutions include microfinance institutions, including those which take deposits, and savings and credit cooperatives (SACCOs).

There may be a case in principle for subsidising the provision of financial services for smallholders, because rural financial markets are undoubtedly afflicted with market imperfections, but I don’t think it is a very compelling one in practice.

Clearly the public resources available for supporting agricultural modernisation are highly constrained and it would be a more efficient use of these scarce resources to focus them on providing public goods such as agricultural extension services rather than in reducing the cost of credit.

Furthermore, the availability of subsidised credit creates incentives for its misallocation; it is very difficult to target subsidised credit effectively at those borrowers who need it the most and prevent it being diverted to richer farmers instead.

Finally I want to stress the importance of more research into all aspects of agricultural finance and its efficacy for agricultural modernisation. The characteristics of smallholder farming in Uganda are very heterogeneous.

What types of agricultural finance work best in different circumstances (different crops, different land tenure systems, etc) is mainly an empirical question for which economic principles can only take us so far.

There is no substitute for detailed empirical research, for example research involving randomised controlled trails. I hope that Ugandan researchers will take up this challenge and help to guide us in charting the way forward for agricultural modernisation in Uganda. On that note I will conclude. Thank you for listening.  

Serving Victoria University As Guild Is Satisfying – Keith Mugabi

 

By his own words, Keith Mugabi never intended to come to Victoria University and contest for guild presidency. However the desire grew when he saw that the University needed people like him to serve in different capacities. He choose to go for guild presidency and lead students.

In this interview he explains how satisfying it has been for him at the helm of student leadership. He also mentions the challenges and achievements he has been able to register three months after being elected guild president in December, 2015. Read the full interview below. 

Briefly tell our readers why of all Universities in Uganda you chose to join Victoria University?

The reason I joined Victoria University is because it offered me what I wanted in a university. All the schools I went to, are not upscale, but they offered me quality education. I believe Victoria University has the right facilities, environment and education that I wanted. I believe Victoria University has a lot to offer. As a beginning learning institution, it has its ups and downs but we are trying to build the gap together with administration.

As guild president, what is your typical day like at campus?

Every day my day starts at 6:30am when I wake up to get ready for the day. I say a prayer because we are a strong Christian born again family. I am at campus by 8am and leave campus at about 8pm after doing course works, research and other study related activities. The university offers a good learning environment, I have two lectures a day and I give my education about 22 hours a week. I keep in mind that I am still a student and that I am at university to study.

Why did you join the guild race at Victoria University?

I wanted to serve this Victoria University, I have always wanted to serve people. I felt I could do a good job at. I felt the guild needed some sort of ground work because they were running without a constitution. I felt that was one of the major things we needed as a guild.

We needed to bridge the gap between students and administration. The constitution has been drafted and waiting for approval. I didn’t stand for guild president because of political reasons or ambitions but I felt I had to offer myself to lead this institution, mold the guild office because it’s a vital of the university.

How has it been in last few months you have guild president?

The last months have not been hectic as I thought it would be. I majorly put my effort on my core things that I what I really wanted to achieve as guild president, the administration has been helpful so it has toned down my work. And then having a team you can work with has been helpful because without a team your efforts are going to be fruitless.

There hasn’t been many challenges that I can attest too and frustrated me but of course there are small ups and downs. The students expect a lot from the guild. It being a new university they expect a lot of entertainment, having fun, it’s a challenge to organize all those events without depleting the guild fund. Having a small guild fund has been a bit of a challenge but you have to work out a way to satisfy students. We try to live within our means.

Keith Mugabi takes a selfie photo with other students

On the side of achievements; we have drafted the constitution – having the draft alone is an achievement. We are going to have a cafeteria at campus that help student get a few snacks at the university campus.

How did becoming a guild president change your life?

Being guild president has opened my eyes to new things; number one – leadership – I have always seen leaders and judged them for the decisions they have made but being guild president has opened my eyes not to make decisions on only feelings but also fact and considering other people. I have met people who I can change my life. I feel the joy that I have been to serve as guild president.

What do you like about your job as guild?

The beauty that I can listen to different voices of students and pick out what they want, what they feel the campus should be and take it to administration, I feel it is a landmark. I feel serving Victoria University as guild president has left a landmark in my life that I will never forget. It has given me the opportunity to make friends.

Should we expect you to go for political officer say for MP?

As of now I am trying to find my footing in this world. I am not an old man, I am still young. Yes I have dreams but I have never thought of serving in a higher officer say as a Member of Parliament but being guild president has been a stepping stone in my life. I can’t say if I will stand for those big officers in the future but don’t surprised if an opportunity comes and I take it.

What makes you stand out as a leader?

Well for starters – I think my passion to serve people is what makes me stand out. Many people look at these leadership positions in terms of finances, what will I gain from it but I want to serve this university. Those other things that come with this office are extras. I am also God fearing, a friend to all.

 

See Which Food Suits Your Zodiac Sign

 

Astrology, humbug or science? Even if you don’t believe in fortune telling, everyone has read some sort of daily horoscope before, it is fun and entertaining; sometimes it totally relates to one’s personal situation.

Some go further and say that the Zodiac Sign not only determines your character, success in work and relationships but also your food preferences and which foods are beneficial or harmful for your well being

Hellofood takes your wellbeing very seriously and conducted a research together with central and eastern European psychologists on specificities of different star signs and their relationship with eating habits.

Aries

They are brave and honest and often considered as insensitive people, but this does not apply to their food preferences. You cannot go wrong with Aries if you raise the topic of good wine and dishes. They favor foods in red, green and everything spicy.

Aries eat: brown rice, bananas, fruit juices, olives, tomatoes, onions, lettuce, cucumbers, spinach, beans, lentils, walnuts, figs, garlic and mustard. Foods to avoid: salt and alcohol.

Taurus

The Taurus is steady, stubborn, passionate and disciplined. People of this sign have a passion for luxury. They prefer the best foods that can be found in stores and restaurants, like risotto with black truffles, oysters, and lobster served with champagne.

Taurus eat: blueberries, asparagus, beefs, cauliflower, cucumbers, spinach, onions, radishes, and squash. Foods to avoid: rich and heavy foods and excessive amounts of carbohydrates.

Gemini

People under this star sign are fearless, creative, fun and sometimes large rebels. They love travelling and new experiences. They love all foods in yellow, green, orange, and even more the exotic cuisine – Moroccan and Caribbean.

The Gemini eats: Plums, oranges, grapefruit, grape juice, raisins, apples, lettuce, spinach, carrots, and celery. Things to avoid: coffee and root vegetables such as potatoes. 

Cancer

Cancer is one of the most sensitive and emotional zodiac sign. They like to feel protected and prefer domesticity. They prefer the light flavors and creamy texture. French cuisine is best for them, especially prepared at home.

Cancers eat whole grain rye, rice, oats, fruits, bananas, steamed vegetables, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, tomatoes, beets, squash, cucumbers, beans and natural sugars. They should avoid fatty foods, salt, sweet and refined sugar. 

Leo

The lion is one of the strongest signs of zodiac. They like to command and keep things in their own hands. They can be extremely arrogant, but extremely fun. Thanks to their ruling planet, Sun, they prefer fiery colors - orange, yellow, red. Adequate food is mish- mash or spicy chicken with lots of paprika. They eat whole grains, rice, citrus fruits, apples, potatoes, carrots and radishes. They should avoid dairy products. 

Virgo

Virgo are analytical, practical perfectionists and may be critical. They weigh the pros and cons very carefully before any decision. The representatives of the zodiac sign Virgo are the best cooks. However, they do not like to experiment and rely on well-known foods.

They eat whole grains and cereals, oats, fruit salads, fruit juices, lemon juice, soups, teas and almonds. They should avoid severe food and chocolate. 

Libra

People born under this zodiac are intelligent and creative. They are fans of love and dreams. You can get away from the world and live in his fantasy. They prefer red wine, cheese and spicy foods. They eat apples, grapes, strawberries, raisins, steamed vegetables, spinach, tomatoes, cheese, nuts and almonds. They should avoid hard alcohol and carbonated drinks. 

Scorpio 

Scorpios have great passion, energy and intensity. They have extremely strong personalities. They have a special relationship with the food they eat. The food must be non-traditional and made with love. What would catch them is squid in a dark sauce, cheese with blueberry jam and chocolate soufflé. 

They like to eat coconut, cauliflower, onions, radishes, tomatoes, asparagus, cucumbers, beets and seafood. They should avoid fatty foods, salt, sweet and refined sugar. 

Sagittarius

Managed by the fire of this sign, they are modest, idealistic and eager for new experiences. Their adventurous nature allows them to enjoy travel and thus to try new flavors of Indian or Japanese cuisine.Duck, foie gras and sushi are their preferred foods. They eat cereals, pears, apples, oranges, strawberries, olives, duck meat and garlic. They should avoid spicy foods and sweets. 

Capricorn

Capricorns are stable, practical and profound. These creative beings are often attracted to theater and music. They never experiment in the kitchen. They have a set of 5 dishes that they consume and can prepare. They eat rice, vegetables, spices, cabbage, corn, soups, teas, nuts, figs, eggs and flaxseed. They avoid rich and heavy foods, dairy products and chocolate. 

Aquarius

This is the friendliest, sensitive, gentle and abstract character of the zodiac signs. They are found in any party because they are flexible and prefer social gatherings to being at home. Aquarians prefer a menu with different textures, colors and blends. Their ideal diet consists of seasonal vegetables, ham, blue cheese and olives. They like to eat apples, oranges, pears, steamed vegetables, corn, carrots, tomatoes, nuts, dates, ginger, and protein bars. They should avoid refined Sugar. 

Pisces

People of this sign are flexible, adaptive, but sometimes mystical. They are in a high spiritual level. They eat only once a day. They like herbs, well-decorated seafood and cheesecake for dessert. They prefer eating wheat, whole grains, rice, oats, seaweed, beans, dates, and natural sugars. They should avoid coffee, fatty foods, sour foods, and asparagus, salt and sweet.

Victoria University To Train Medical Workers

 

Victoria University, one of the leading private universities in Uganda, has reiterated its commitment to train medical workers as Dr. Patience M. Arinaitwe, the Dean Faculty of Health Sciences Victoria University, explains in this interview.

What subjects would you advise young Students to pursue at A’levels in order for them to pursue courses under your Faculty of Health Sciences? 

Mainly PCB for Clinical Science programmes (BNS, BMS and possibly Nutrition and Dietetics), All subjects including Arts but with some Biology for Public Health

What types of degrees and certificates are available in your Faculty of Health Sciences?

Currently BNS, BMS,BND, BPH (Degrees); There’s an upgrade for Midwifery Science for diploma holders; For Certificates we have Short Course in Public Health (SCIPH) and others. 

What is the relationship between Bachelor of Nursing Science & Bachelor of Midwifery Science? What are the entry requirements?

Bachelor of Nursing Sciences (BNS) is a 4 Year Programme. BNS curriculum is designed to meet the challenges of healthcare delivery. The course is highly demanding and designed to use community-orientated, evidence and skills-based approaches in order to be highly responsive to the needs of urban and rural communities.

BNS Entry Requirements are: Uganda Advanced Certificate of Education or its equivalent and 2 principal passes obtained at the same sitting in Physics, Chemistry or Biology or Diploma in Nursing from a recognised Institution and must be certified by the Uganda Nurses & Midwives Council (UNMC).

Bachelor of Midwifery Science is a 2 Year Top up Program. The post-diploma midwifery science top-up degree program is designed to enhance the student’s ability to use community–oriented, evidence-based approaches in the provision of midwifery care that is responsive to the needs of the community in both rural and urban settings.

The Bachelor of Midwifery Science program will cover two academic years, which is a five (5) semesters degree course.This program will be implemented using a variety of teaching and learning modes that encourage active and student centred learning to ensure that the graduates become life-long self–directed learners to be able to meet the challenges in healthcare delivery.

Is your Faculty of Health Sciences going to be part of your future VU School of Medicine? What’s the distinction?

Yes it and will infact be the home of the Medical School; health sciences and especially the clinical parts are complementary – e.g. nurses and midwives (BNS and BMS respectively) work with doctors on a daily basis to provide healthcare – Medicine will just be an addition to the menu of courses in the Faculty and not necessarily a separate one.

What types of service opportunities does your Faculty of Health Sciences render to your current Students and Graduates?

Apart from the excellent student-teacher interaction (remember VU has has the best ratio in Uganda so teachers really know their students!) we offer career guidance, arrange internships and field placements.

We emphasise the community linkage whereby our students are supported to design real-life projects offering solutions to community health problems. Furthermore we organize exposure events for the students e.g. attending scientific conference for learning, presenting their work and networking among others.

What courses can be done part-time?

All courses have a provision for flexibility if the student numbers  and other administrative factors are favourable. In the future we plan to offer some Health Science courses via distance or online.

Do you consider Credit transfer from say a certain University to VU?

We do, there’s a system called Accreditation of Previous/ Experiential Learning (APEL) whereby a student applies to be exempt from a course unit or module they think has already been covered elsewhere. 

When we receive this application we do carefully look for similarity in content (especially related to curriculum but also teaching/learning methods used) as well as student performance. If satisfied then the student can be exempt; it is on a case-by-case basis and the student has to formally initiate the process by filing an APEL application to the Dean.

How does one apply for a course /program in your Faculty of Health Sciences? 

Simply fill out the application form (there’s a provision for this online on the VU website), attach the required documents and submit to registry or admissions at VU.   Also applicants can just walk into the university with their academic documents and our supportive Admissions team can work with them to submit an application the same day!

What are the application deadline dates and who can one contact for advising on Health Science Courses?

1st week of March 2016 is the deadline. For any further clarification please contact us on Tel: (+256) 417 727 000, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We are Located at Victoria Towers, Plot 1-13, Jinja Road.

For details about Faculty of Health Sciences  and other courses visit the University’s website at  www.vu.ac.ug.

 

 

Top 8 Super Immune-Boosting Foods In Uganda

 

Uganda is endowed with all sorts of food that your body needs. Living a healthy lifestyle is now trending globally, because of some reasons such as the high expense of medical care. Research shows that our body’s pH balance affects our overall health and many foods we eat can make us too acidic where unhealthy cells can thrive. 

Especially now, where the many viruses and cancers have become the topic of most discussions, it’s important to know that the natural remedies produced by your own immune system, provide the most effective healing agents on earth. hellofood advises on how to boost your immune system and offers a wide choice of restaurants to eat well even when you're in a rush.  

Garlic – Although a lot of us shy away from eating this food - perhaps because of its pungent smell and its popular reputation for causing bad breath - the garlic is however, a powerhouse of properties that boost the immune system and has over the years, been used as a medicine to prevent and treat a wide range of diseases. Including this to your diet on a regular basis could do a whole lot of good so add a few chopped cloves to your cooking, if you cannot have it raw. 

Yogurt – In recent years, so-called “good bacteria” was found in foods like yogurt and sauerkraut, which may help your immune system work well and improve digestion. This healthy and delicious source of protein contains probiotics which lines intestinal walls that helps to fend off harmful bacteria like salmonella in your body. Intake can increase the white blood cell count which helps keeping your immune system in check. 

Lemon - This precious fruit brings amazing benefits to your health. It is a natural energizer, hydrating and oxygenating the body so it feels revitalized and refreshed. Lemons contain lots of antioxidants and are rich in vitamin C, which improves the immune system. It is also known to improve digestion. Drinking lemon water alkalizes the body, hence balances your pH level. 

Avocado - It’s a real 'Super Food'. Avocados, which are actually classified as a fruit, are rich in monounsaturated fat that is easily burned for energy. This increases our healthy fat and calorie intake without seriously increasing our protein or carbohydrate intake. It is also helpful for blood sugar health- aids in regulating and stabilizing blood sugar, contains lutein which protects your eyes from age related degeneration. 

Spinach – Popeye didn’t pop this one for nothing. Spinach is packed with numerous antioxidants and vitamins to include Vitamin C, E and A. The nutrients in spinach encourage the white blood cells production in the body which helps guard against diseases. 

Oysters – Thanks to the mineral zinc that's found in oysters. Low zinc levels have been associated with male infertility. And zinc appears to have some antiviral effect, although researchers can't explain why. However, they do know it is important to several immune system tasks including healing wounds.


Sweet Potatoes - Sweet potatoes provide a rich concentration of nutrients and disease fighting components. Several recent studies have shown the superior ability of sweet potatoes to raise our blood levels of vitamin A. Vitamin A is an immune enhancer that heightens the antibody response, maintains and restores the integrity and function of all mucosal surfaces. 

Elderberry- An old folk remedy, extract from these dark berries appears to block flu viruses in test tube studies. But scientists caution that further study is needed. The fruit itself is rich in antioxidants and may also have the ability to fight inflammation. 

To awaken our vehicle, we should invest in our health and our bodies by making conscious decisions to monitor what we ingest. A little goes a long way and by cultivating these healthy habits, our bodies would be better equipped to fend off unwanted diseases. Our body is the only thing which we have that we can truly call ours, so treat it with care.

 

Victoria University Students Discuss Role Of Religion In Politics

 

Victoria University students heard that religious leaders are not doing what is enough to shape the political agenda of Uganda. The critical observation was reached at during a public dialogue which took place at Victoria University campus on Jinja Road in Kampala.

The public dialogue was organized together with Human Rights and Peace Centre (HURIPEC) under the theme “Religion, Politics and National Identity: A Look at the 2016 Presidential and Parliamentary Elections.” Former presidential candidate Maj Gen Benon Biraaro was chief guest and speaker.

Speaking at the dialogue, Maj Gen Biraaro said religious leader have not put democracy high on their agenda adding that churches and mosques are not democratic enough internally and lack the moral standards to guide this country.

Angelo Izama, a journalist while giving a key note address to students said religion has lost its influence on setting political agenda unlike in the past. “The religious institutions lost their moral power to have an influence in politics because bent low for politics,” Izama stated.

Maj Gen Biraaro who became a people’s darling because of his articulation of issues and having a good political plan for this country during the last two presidential debates speaking at Victoria University said morality has taken a back seat in politics. Morality is the loser, he emphasized.

“We need to go back to the drawing board. Let’s say we want to create a path were a loser will congratulate the winner. Let’s agree to a position when you lose and congratulate the winner,” Maj Gen Biraaro said in reference to the continued impasse between President Museveni and opposition leaders.

The retired soldier and a bush war hero, who also believes that democracy in Uganda has not failed but rather needs  to be given a chance to start, says he is looking at a national dialogue that will bring together Ugandans to find a political solution to the situation the country has found itself in.

“We need to give dialogue maximum time. If I go at it alone it won’t work. I am looking for men and women of integrity. The problem is that when I contact some of them, they ask me - do you think president Museveni will like it – I feel bad.” Maj Gen Biraaro says of his effort to put in place a national dialogue to make Uganda better politically.

While Maj Gen Biraaro and Izama would love to see religious leaders play a part in the politics of the country some students explained that this is not right citing the constitution which bars religious leaders from directly getting involved in the country’s politics.

Energy Savings Tips For Your Home

 

Did you know that your electrical system/bills take up 50 percent of your household bills? With the convenience of Yaka (a local pre-paid billing system in Uganda), it is now easier to load small amounts of money to keep the lights. However these small amounts total up to an exorbitant amount at the end of the month.

It is important to monitor your electricity usage in order to save on your household bills. With a sharp rise in electricity prices from 558.4 to 667.4 shillings per unit it is important to maintain low power usage.  In this article, Lamudi, an online portal that connect property buyers and sellers, shares with you tips on how you can save on electricity in your home:

Use your fridge efficiently

Your fridge is always in use, making it your most expensive appliance. To save electricity make sure the door is closed tight and free from gaps so cold air can't escape. The ideal fridge temperature is around 5 degrees and the freezer temperature is -15 to -18 degrees Celsius. If these temperatures are not maintained the fridge will consume a lot of electricity to maintain it.

Turning off electric appliances when after use

This is a standard energy saving method , switching off all electric appliances that are not in use is important. For example irons, water heaters, televisions and the likes. You should switch off appliances that are not in use or minimize the number of electrical appliances that are switched on at the same time. Your electricity bill is bound to be high if you use all your appliances at the same time.

Use energy-efficient light globes

Replace old light bulbs with energy-efficient bulbs these save power and last longer. Ensure that you are using bulbs whose electricity consumption is low such as fluorescent bulbs that save up to almost 80 percent on energy consumption and not bulbs that consume more power.

You should also make sure that you have natural lighting into your house so that you will not have to switch on the lights during the day. Using solar energy can also help in reducing the cost of electricity.

Proper use of cooling devices

With the current heat wave air conditioners and fans are the most used appliances. To reduce the humidity/heat in your home ensure that the internal fan speed on your air conditioning system is slowed down. The movement of air through the machine will allow it to remove more moisture, which makes you feel much cooler. For the fan it’s better to keep the fan speed high.

Buganda Explains Mandatory Land Registration

 

Buganda Land Board recently launched a campaign aimed at registering all Title-holders on Kabaka’s land in a bid to regularize their tenancy.  Buganda Land Board Head of Legal Ndawula Barnabas in this interview explains the motives of the campaign. 

Please tell us what the campaign is all about the wetuukire campaign you launched recently.

Wetuukire’ is a campaign that is calling upon all persons currently in possession of land titles on Kabaka’s land, which were formerly issued by Uganda Land Commission and District Land Boards to regularize their tenancy with Buganda Land Board. The campaign is scheduled to start on March 1st and will end on April 30th 2016. 

What do you exactly mean by Kabaka’s land and what areas does it cover?

Kabaka’s land refers to all that land vested in the Kabaka of Buganda by virtue of his office and held in custody for the people of Buganda. Kabaka’s land includes:

  • The Kings official estate ‘Olusuku lwa Ssabasajja’ measuring 350 square miles covering the counties of Kyadondo, Busiiro, Kyagwe, including such areas as Munyonyo and Makindye and Buziga.
  • It also covers all land that was managed and controlled by the Buganda Land Board as a creature of the 1962 constitution of Uganda, which entails urban and peri-urban areas of municipalities and towns in Buganda kingdom
  • It also includes the Sazza and Gomboloola estates measuring 8 square miles and 49 acres respectively found in all districts of Buganda covering some parts of Mukono, Wakiso and Kampala and different areas within rural/up country districts in Buganda region. 

How is it that persons were able to obtain titles on Kabaka’s land in the first place?Individuals did get hold of titles on Kabaka’s land especially lease titles by way of interests created by Uganda Land Commission and the District Land Boards. 

Wasn’t the issuance of such titles by Uganda Land Commission and District Land Boards legally binding?

In light of the prevailing circumstances at the time, one may say that technically it was legal because it was state sanctioned. The Central Government under the Obote-I Republican constitution of 1967 confiscated Buganda Kingdom assets, of which land was the largest.

The 1967 constitution also created the Uganda Land Commission which was given the mandate to manage all public land, of which the confiscated Buganda Kingdom land was among.

This was further escalated by the 1975 Land Decree which declared all land to be public land and vested the same in the State to be held in trust for the people of Uganda and to be administered by the Uganda Land Commission. Further still, in 1998 District Land Boards were created and given further mandate to manage land within their respective districts. 

If the titles were legal then, what is the rationale behindBuganda Land Board’s regularization of tenancy on the same land now?

Buganda Land Board is regularizing tenancy on the land becausethe land was officially handed back to Kabaka’s Government. In 1993, the Government of Uganda through the Traditional Rulers Restitution of Assets and Properties Act Cap 247 entered various legally binding agreements with Buganda Kingdom culminating into a memorandum of understanding between themselves in 2013 under which various land titles and properties were officially returned to the Kabaka. 

Are there any repercussions that can affect tenants who haven’t had their titles validated by BLB?

Yes,it is vital for title holders to have their titles validated because Buganda Land Board is now the controlling authority of the land. As the authority, Buganda Land Board needs to know the tenants currently residing on the land. Once BLB has the knowledge of the tenancy and has authenticated the tenancy, the title holder will enjoy security of tenure guaranteed by BLB.

In addition, financial institutions and Commercial Banks are now accepting only those land titles on Kabaka’s land that have been validated by Buganda Land Board. Furthermore, all transactions to include the sale, exchange or donation of land with titles on Kabaka’s land are now rendered invalid by law, if not consented to by Buganda Land Board. 

Does this mean that Buganda Land Board wants to evict tenants off Kabaka’s land through the Wetuukire campaign?

‘Wetuukire’ campaign is an initiative by Buganda Land Board to ensure that all tenants on Kabaka’s land enjoy peaceful and economically sustainable use of the land they occupy. Buganda Land Board is therefore not chasing anyone off Kabaka’s land.

We are simply acting within our mandate and calling upon all tenants on Kabaka’s land that received land titles issued by Uganda Land Commission and District Land Boards to come  and regularize their land titles with Buganda Kingdom, this is both free hold and Lease titles.

In brief, are you saying that one cannot buy /sell or mortgage this land in a legally binding manner unless and until the same has been validated by BLB?

The simple answer to that is YES! It is therefore entirely to the benefit of the title holder to heed to our call to have their land title regularized at this point to avoid inconveniences in the future. All those that don’t comply will handled within the existing law.

 

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