Geodata Gap Hindering Natural Resources Boom

Stakeholders from across Africa met in order to examine innovative ways within which geodata COURTESY PHOTO Stakeholders from across Africa met in order to examine innovative ways within which geodata

Experts in Africa’s natural resource extraction business have decried the lack of geodata as one setback curtailing policy formulation and investment deployment despite availability of evidence that the continent is home to numerous wealth minerals. 

Therefore stakeholders from across Africa in order to examine innovative ways within which geodata (geoscientific data) can be generated, managed and used to contribute to social and economic structural transformation, wealth creation, and poverty reduction recently met on Friday, March 24, 2017 at Imperial Resort Beach Hotel, Entebbe, Uganda.

The two-day workshop was organized by the African Union Commission (AUC) in partnership with the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the Uganda Chamber of Mines and Petroleum (UCMP) under the theme: “A New Beginning: A collaborative partnering approach towards African Geodata”.

“While Africa has always been endowed with rich natural resources, the continent has not fully benefited from them due to an assortment of factors. One of the major holdbacks is the limited availability of geodata to guide policy and investment,” noted Hon Richard Kaijuka, the Vice President of the Uganda Chamber of Mines and Petroleum.

Frank Mugyenyi, Senior Industry Advisor for the Department of Trade and Industry at the AUC, explained that making geodata readily available and accessible to government, industry and other stakeholders not only enables effective decision-making but helps create more value and generate more revenues, along the minerals’ value chain.

“According to the Africa Mining Vision, the Africa Union Commission recognizes that geodata provides a foundation to facilitate inclusive and sustainable economic growth by stimulating industrial and inward investment”, he emphasized.

He however, pointed out that exploration is a complex, risky and highly costly venture that requires a multi-stakeholder collaboration and coordination, hence the need to build confidence and enhance trust between the public and private sector in order to attract investment.

The workshop theme was guided by the aspirations of the Agenda 2063, the principles of the Africa Mining Vision and within the framework of Africa Minerals Governance Framework.

The workshop attracted key stakeholders from across Africa in order to examine innovative ways within which geodata (geoscientific data) can be generated, managed and used to contribute to social and economic structural transformation, wealth creation, and poverty reduction.

The geodata gap has influenced African Union Commission to initiate this geodata compiling effort. The Africa Mining Vision (AMV) which is a flagship of the Agenda 2063 recognizes resources’ geodata as an imperative for countries to strengthen their positions when negotiating complex agreements in extractives, agriculture, forestry, fisheries, infrastructure and tourism sector.

Studies have shown that, with geodata, returns on investments in exploration in Africa could result in a multiplier effect of 1:20. This means that for every investment of $1 in exploration, the country will generate $20 in returns across the broader economy.

The workshop tried to find concrete solutions to Africa’s geodata shortfalls and drew expert participants from member states and institutions across Africa, Britain and Canada.

Discussions were centered on: Data requirements, Data Management and Technology Innovation, a business case for a public-spirited partnership (PPP) Model and Capacity Building.

The key outcome of the workshop was an agreement on a regional pilot project for the Eastern African region with the portal to be hosted by Uganda. The pilot project which will be under the auspices of AUC will be conducted in a collaborative partnership between the British Geological Survey (BGS), Geosoft of Canada with the Uganda Geological Survey and the Uganda Chamber of Mines and Petroleum.

This will be based on a Public Private Partnership (PPP) Business Model for generating, management and ownership of geodata by participating countries and it's expected to be piloted in other African countries.

Experts in Africa’s natural resource extraction business have decried the lack of geodata as one setback curtailing policy formulation and investment deployment despite availability of evidence that the continent is home to numerous wealth minerals. 

Therefore stakeholders from across Africa in order to examine innovative ways within which geodata (geoscientific data) can be generated, managed and used to contribute to social and economic structural transformation, wealth creation, and poverty reduction recently met on Friday, March 24, 2017 at Imperial Resort Beach Hotel, Entebbe, Uganda.

The two-day workshop was organized by the African Union Commission (AUC) in partnership with the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the Uganda Chamber of Mines and Petroleum (UCMP) under the theme: “A New Beginning: A collaborative partnering approach towards African Geodata”.

“While Africa has always been endowed with rich natural resources, the continent has not fully benefited from them due to an assortment of factors. One of the major holdbacks is the limited availability of geodata to guide policy and investment,” noted Hon Richard Kaijuka, the Vice President of the Uganda Chamber of Mines and Petroleum.

Frank Mugyenyi, Senior Industry Advisor for the Department of Trade and Industry at the AUC, explained that making geodata readily available and accessible to government, industry and other stakeholders not only enables effective decision-making but helps create more value and generate more revenues, along the minerals’ value chain.

“According to the Africa Mining Vision, the Africa Union Commission recognizes that geodata provides a foundation to facilitate inclusive and sustainable economic growth by stimulating industrial and inward investment”, he emphasized.

He however, pointed out that exploration is a complex, risky and highly costly venture that requires a multi-stakeholder collaboration and coordination, hence the need to build confidence and enhance trust between the public and private sector in order to attract investment.

The workshop theme was guided by the aspirations of the Agenda 2063, the principles of the Africa Mining Vision and within the framework of Africa Minerals Governance Framework.

The workshop attracted key stakeholders from across Africa in order to examine innovative ways within which geodata (geoscientific data) can be generated, managed and used to contribute to social and economic structural transformation, wealth creation, and poverty reduction.

The geodata gap has influenced African Union Commission to initiate this geodata compiling effort. The Africa Mining Vision (AMV) which is a flagship of the Agenda 2063 recognizes resources’ geodata as an imperative for countries to strengthen their positions when negotiating complex agreements in extractives, agriculture, forestry, fisheries, infrastructure and tourism sector.

Studies have shown that, with geodata, returns on investments in exploration in Africa could result in a multiplier effect of 1:20. This means that for every investment of $1 in exploration, the country will generate $20 in returns across the broader economy.

The workshop tried to find concrete solutions to Africa’s geodata shortfalls and drew expert participants from member states and institutions across Africa, Britain and Canada.

Discussions were centered on: Data requirements, Data Management and Technology Innovation, a business case for a public-spirited partnership (PPP) Model and Capacity Building.

The key outcome of the workshop was an agreement on a regional pilot project for the Eastern African region with the portal to be hosted by Uganda. The pilot project which will be under the auspices of AUC will be conducted in a collaborative partnership between the British Geological Survey (BGS), Geosoft of Canada with the Uganda Geological Survey and the Uganda Chamber of Mines and Petroleum.

This will be based on a Public Private Partnership (PPP) Business Model for generating, management and ownership of geodata by participating countries and it's expected to be piloted in other African countries.

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter the (*) required information where indicated. HTML code is not allowed.

26°C

Kampala

Mostly Cloudy

Humidity: 74%

Wind: 22.53 km/h

  • 24 Mar 2016 28°C 22°C
  • 25 Mar 2016 28°C 21°C