African Governments To Examine Informal Economy And Climate Change

The City of Praia (Cape Verde) will host the 4th World Forum on Local Economic Development (LED), October 17-20, 2017. Over 1,500 participants from 120 countries are expected to attend the meeting organized by UNDP, United Cities and Local Government, ILO, The Andalusian Fund of Municipalities for International Solidarity and ORU-FOGAR.

 UCLG Africa, the umbrella organization of local governments on the continent, will participate in the event with a delegation led by the Secretary General, Mr. Jean Pierre Elong Mbassi.

The Forum will be a venue for exchange on local economic development. The theme of the 4th edition is, "The contributions of local economic development to the implementation of the 2030 development program." It aims to provide guidance and principles for action to implement SDG 8: Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all and SDG 17: Partnerships for the goals.

The organizing committee's presentation sheet specifies that a special emphasis will be placed on the reduction of inequalities through local economic development. 

The forum will witness the participation of the President of the Republic of Cape Verde; the Prime Minister of Cape Verde; ministers from Ivory Coast, Angola, Mauritania and Bolivia, as well as numerous local and regional elected officials from Africa and other parts of the world.

During the forum, UCLG Africa will organize two sessions on October 18, 2017; the first of which is entitled, "Climate Change and LED: How to mitigate the effects of Climate Change while promoting Local Economic Development."

This will focus on the economic opportunities that climate change offers to people, including the poorest, building on the good practices of some African cities, notably Porto-Novo with the Songhai project implemented in Benin and on the experience of the 11 pilot cities, parties to the Covenant of Mayors for Sub-Saharan Africa.

The second session entitled, "Informal economy between regularization and access during transitional phases," will highlight the issues that need to be addressed with regard to the integration of the informal sector into the local economic development strategies and solutions provided by local governments in Africa and elsewhere.

Hotel Review: Dolphin Suites, A Home From Home

The quality of Hotels in Uganda are fast changing, becoming super good and of high international standards. Take Dolphin Suites located at Plot 36, Princess Anne Drive, Bugolobi in Kampala for example. The hotel opened its doors to guests in May 2010 by Speke Group which is a subsidiary of the Ruparelia Group and has proved the ultimate luxury destination for people in Kampala.

The hotel on inception committed to provide ‘a friendly and courteous service’ and to provide a ‘a perfect ambience that will ensure value for money’ to its traveling guests. Dolphin Suites has established itself as the epitome of relaxed grandeur, welcoming visitors to the city with stunningly appointed rooms and a host of facilities.

It is a unique boutique style hotel offering 27 luxurious and comfortable guest rooms with individual balconies overlooking the hillside of Bugolobi and city of Kampala. An Ideal choice for those who want a quiet stay, close to business and corporate houses, while being located just 5 KM from the city centre and 35 KM north from the Entebbe International Airport.

A combination of services and dedication of the trained and motivated staff will make your stay comfortable leaving you feeling home-away-from-home. Members, residents and guests can also take time out to relax and de-stress with a little pampering.

“We offer an array of beauty and relaxation treatments for members to enjoy—from a massage to ease any worries away, to a relaxing facial or an invigorating body exfoliation treatment. The hotel also has an excellent bar, restaurant and outstanding banqueting facilities where one may relax, meet friends or even discuss business.” Management said in a statement.

On the side of accommodation, the hotel offers Single Deluxe Rooms featuring a king size bed made with premium linens and features exquisite duvets for absolute comfort. Also available are Double/Twin Deluxe rooms featuring two single beds in a large spacious area with beautiful lights and well-designed beds. All the beds are fitted with mosquito nets and are in large spacious rooms with added specials.

The hotel offers services like a health club, gym, massage, steam & sauna, swimming pool, family friendly facilities, restaurant, parking space and conference facilities. Others are swimming pool, laundry, security, health services, wake up call, internet, car hire, photocopying, email and fax facilities.

Guests can host their special occasions like conferences and meetings, weddings, birthday, corporate parties, anniversaries, graduation, retreats and team building activities, product and media launches among others. 

The guests have the pleasure of two dining options: at the restaurant and in the garden area. The restaurant offers breakfast, lunch, and dinner as well as a breakfast buffet, featuring made-to-order eggs of your choice. You'll find a delicious selection of hearty or light fare for lunch and dinner.

Since the restaurant is multi-cuisine, it serves famous & mouth-watering local, continental and authentic Indian dishes and live cooking of charcoal grilled “Muchomo”. It also serves world-class drinks and cocktails as per our guests' liking.

Speke Resort, Victoria University To Host Pan African Youth Forum

Speke Resort and Conference center will from 16th-17th October host the highly rated Pan-African Youth Forum being organized by Africa Mashariki Fest in partnership with Victoria University Kampala and Uganda Youth Network.

President Yoweri Museveni, has been confirmed as the keynote speaker at this year’s Forum which will be held under the theme is ‘Empowering a generation to Change the African Narrative’. Other guest speakers like former African Union chairperson Dr.Nkosazama Dlamini Zuma, Dr.Arthur Bainomugisha the Executive director of ACODE, Prof. Patrick L.O. Lumumba of the Kenyan Law Society among several others will attend.

Afrika Mashariki Fest (AMF) or East Africa Fest is a regional youth platform that’s engaging the young generation across East Africa in embracing regional integration through Art, Sports and Civil Society Advocacy. Participants are paying Ushs350, 000 to attend. Registration is currently going on at the reception of NTV at the Serena Hotel in Kampala.

This year’s Forum brings you a fully complete message on EAC Integration process. You will learn more on Issues that matter to East Africa and Africa as a whole from top regional leaders and analysts. The conference which will be running from 9am to 5pm daily, will also be spiced up by several other activities which will also include entertainment.

Speke Resort Munyonyo is a 5 star hotels in Kampala offering the ultimate in luxury accommodation and leisure facilities with the finest conference and business meetings. The hotel is situated in an idyllic setting in Munyonyo, 30 minutes away from Kampala City and by the shores of Lake Victoria.

Uganda, Ethiopia In One Coffee Climate Boat

By Boaz Opio

The democratic republic of Uganda and the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, these two eastern African countries have a lot in common. Ethiopians believe human life presence started in their country—just like Ugandans. Though these folklores do not tell us when or how this coincidental theories come about, there’s a lot more 21st century similarities to explore and possibly learn from one another.

The most important and obvious similarity is about coffee. Ethiopia is the world’s Coffea arabica producer. Today, the country is the largest African producer of Arabica coffee and the fifth in the entire world.

Uganda is the second biggest producer in Africa. In both countries, coffee is the backbone of their economies.  

However, though 15 million Ethiopians depend on it for a living, it is already predicted that by the end of this century, increasing temperatures could make it impossible to grow coffee in about half of the country’s coffee-growing areas, according to a study published today in Nature Plants.

This is because Arabica coffee trees require mild temperatures to survive, ideally between 59 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit. Climate projections show that Ethiopia will generally become warmer and drier, and that means that 40 to 60 percent of areas where coffee is currently grown won’t be suitable to grow the beans, the study says. This means the two brothers will be the most affected if the impacts are not addressed early enough.

The same have provoked stimulus government action towards a climate resilience green economy strategy way back in 2011 as a framework for the new Ethiopia growth and transformation plan implementation between 2010-2025, to achieve the middle income economy by the end of 2025. 

According to Mr. Mulegeta Megist, the head of climate change affairs in the Ethiopian ministry of environment, the country learned that over 87% of emissions came from land related use such as deforestation and charcoal burning. However, Mr. Mulegeta says, “when we drew our strategies, we learnt that agricultural activities does not have to conflict with green growth and land use.”

The effects of climate change – higher temperatures and less rainfall – could take a toll on the countries’ ability to farm their treasured crop. In parts of Ethiopia, spring and summer rains have already declined by 15 percent to 20 percent since the 1970s.

While in Uganda, with over 80% of Ugandans dependent on rain-fed agriculture, which comprises over 60% of export earnings, with coffee exports as the biggest foreign exchange earner, erratic and unseasonal rainfall is already costing over US$60 million a year in crop losses.

Smallholder farmers who produce 90 of it could have their already vulnerable livelihoods made more vulnerable by climate change. Oxfam's 2014 research project interviewed coffee farmers in the Rwenzori Mountains and found that they are aware that the climate is changing and becoming less predictable, and have used various adaptation strategies. But for Arabica coffee, which can only be grown at high altitudes in Uganda, climate change and rising temperatures are likely to further restrict the areas in which it can be grown.

A top-quality harvest can fetch up to $1.5 per kilogram, but buyers will pay much less for a harvest including so-called "black beans," cherries picked before they were ripe. Some harvests may even be rejected if the buyer suspects the beans will return "sour, unpleasant coffee that tastes like urine," said Rajabu Kituku, a local manager of Great Lakes Coffee Ltd.

Other two big coffee players of Kenya and Tanzania though produce coffee in a considerable scale are not so much affected directly—not as much as Ethiopia and Uganda by the impacts of global warming. Tanzanian coffee production averages between 30-40,000 metric tons each year of which approximately 70% is Arabica and 30% is Robusta. Kenya, up to 47000 metric tons. In both countries, production grew between 1.7% to 3% in the past 5 years without decline, while Ethiopian production fluctuated in a percentage decline of 2.5 – 3%.

A coincidentally good climate for coffee, then, is what the two big players need to rise their Gross Domestic Products and improve the quality of people’s lives. This could come by learning from each other and implementing climate resilience policies applicable by small-holder coffee farmers dominating the two country’s planting.

Forest Cottages Offers You A Purely African Experience

Africa, and particularly Uganda, is synonymous with beauty and that is one of the reasons the Pearl of Africa has remained a dream travel destination for foreign tourists. This Ugandan beauty is enhanced by the availability of hotel facilities that offer exquisite and classy services.

Hotels like Forest Cottages located at Plot. 17/18, Naguru Hill, Old Kira Road, Bukoto, Kampala, Uganda has ensured that they give a purely African experience to their guests. Whether you are searching for peace and quietness in a natural green setting or the excitement of waking up to humming birds, Forest Cottages offer that ‘wilderness’ experience despite being in the city.

Forest Cottages, one of the many hotels owned by the Ruparelia Group, is a remarkable hotel offering comfort, personalized service and the unique character of facilities that are purely African and of a safari style. Forest Cottages is set in a serene, African forest environment.

At the hotel, you get to feel the touch of nature in a comfortable and unique environment. The selectively planted smaller trees, bushes, shrubs and flowers make Forest Cottages an inspiring destination for nature lovers and eco tourists alike.

The artistic hotel provides a small sanctuary for forest wildlife such as colored turacoes, hornbills, and an additional 20 bird species. The secluded hotel offers peace and quietness in a natural green setting or the excitement of waking up to humming birds. All this beauty is topped up friendly and courteous and professional staff members.

A safari lodge style cottage accommodation in the heart of Kampala city, with individually designed luxurious cottages offering a relaxing and soothing experience. All the cottages are furnished with locally handmade furniture, and equipped with self-catering facilities with all essential amenities to ensure your comfort during your stay.

The Hotel, offers 5 room types from which you can choose. The Standard Single, Standard Double, One Bedroom Cottage, Two Bedroom Cottage and Three Bedroom Cottage which are all ideal for business travellers, tourists, honeymooners and even families on holiday.

A night inside a Standard Single Room goes for $65, Standard Double Room at $72, 1 Bedroom Cottage at $90, $2 Bedroom Cottage at $120 and 3 Bedroom Cottage comes at $165. Half Board per Person $75 (Includes Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner) while full board per Person $85 (Includes Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner).

Forest Cottages’ conference and banquet facilities comprise of meeting space the total of 4 separate rooms. These rooms are capable of seating 10 to 200 guests in various sitting styles, and cater to maximum of 150 guests for a reception. The facilities are equipped with Wi-Fi, conference calls, fax facilities, recording devices are available upon request, PA system, stationary and courteous fulltime staff on hand to assist you during your event.

At Forest Cottages, one can enjoy unique and posh dining in a setting of your choosing. The Avocado Restaurant has a traditional ambience which leaves you in no doubt that you are dining in Africa. With an extensive assortment of cosmopolitan dishes ranging from exclusively local and International cuisine, our guests will be spoilt for choice.

Forest Cottages also provides a venue for weddings. Also airport pickups and drops, safaris, tours around Kampala and day trips to locally made African craft markets can be organized.

A Three Course Set Menu corporate lunch at only Ushs30, 000 per person, every Monday to Friday from 11am to 3pm awaits you. You can book online and get more than 15% discount on luxury cottage accommodation within the city.

Children And Leadership, What You Need To Know

For Christians, many believe leadership comes from God, an assumption which cannot be disputed but one fact which can barely be disputed is that LEADERSHIP provides children with an opportunity to try new things, provide service to others, build self-confidence, and reinforce ethical standards.

This connotation is shared by schools like Kampala Parents’ School who believe that leadership opportunities not only helps students when they are young ‘but also carry forward into their adult lives, improving their relationships, their work lives, their family lives, and the values by which they live’.

“At Kampala Parents’ School, we do this by encouraging our children to enjoy and respect the outdoors while undertaking adventurous activities,”

Additionally, students develop interpersonal skills such as conflict resolution, assertiveness, and listening to peers. These important life skills empower our children to become engaged citizens, skilled professionals, and honorable leaders in our society.

Environmentalists Reach Out To Kids With Disabilities Ahead Of Green Festival

Uganda's Little Hands Go Green and NEMA Uganda joined Cheshire Services Uganda, a local Non Governmental Organization working with Persons with Disabilities and Orphans and Other Vulnerable Children to plant trees at Kyambogo Primary School in the suburbs of Kampala ahead of the Green Festival 2017.

This, officials of Uganda’s Little Hands Go Green said, is a way of bridging the disability gap and promoting Inclusiveness of children with disabilities in our society.

“For a long time, little hands go green has pushed and carried out environmental conservation education in primary schools across Uganda and Rwanda but had not deliberately set out to purposely include children with disabilities directly in the campaign,” Joseph Masembe, the CEO of environmental organization said in a statement.

He added, “This tree planting exercise therefore is the start of a deliberate push and a call to all Ugandans in general to ensure that persons with disabilities are respected and given an opportunity to enjoy a better life by empowering them to take part in the greening efforts as well.”

The exercise which took place Friday afternoon attracted top NEMA Uganda officials led by the executive director Dr. Tom Okurut, celebrated music DJs Slick Stuart and Roger. They participated in the planting of fruit trees.

Uganda’s Little Hands Go Green will on third of September (3rd/9/2017) host parents, guardians and their children at Kololo Airstrip at the annual Kids Green Festival where children are taught the importance of planting trees. Each child who attends the festival takes home a fruit tree seedling of his or her choice.

Marriott International Announces Dynamic New Sales and Marketing Leadership

Marriott International has announced the expansion and strengthening of its Sales and Marketing Leadership Team for Middle East and Africa. This bold new initiative comes on the heels of the successful mega merger between Marriott International and Starwood Hotels and Resorts and the fast progressing integration of the two companies.

The revamped Brand, Marketing, Sales and Consumer Services (BMSC) Leadership Team comprises of highly experienced professionals from Marriott International and legacy Starwood Hotels and Resorts, bringing together exceptional talent and expertise from both companies and speaks to the company’s commitment to support its enhanced footprint and aggressive growth plans in the region.

Led by seasoned Marriott International veteran, Neal Jones, Chief Sales and Marketing Officer, Middle East and Africa, Marriott International, the team will provide dedicated support to the company’s thriving regional portfolio and will be responsible for driving top line revenue for Marriott International brands, ensuring the regional Sales and Marketing strategy is aligned with the company’s vision and priorities.

With a current portfolio of over 240 hotels with 54,000 rooms in 30 countries, Marriott International is working towards targeting a projected growth of 150,000 rooms operational and pipeline in 38 countries by 2022 across Middle East and Africa.

Commenting on the announcement, Neal Jones said, “The leadership changes we are announcing today are important to foster greater synergies, teamwork, accountability and nimble decision-making critical to lay a strong foundation that will support our ambitious growth plans in the region.

I am extremely excited to work together with such a talented and diverse group of leaders who bring with them exceptional domain expertise as well as regional insights that will enable us to create a more vibrant organization that delivers value for all stakeholders.”

“I am confident that with this, we have the right structure and talent in place to accelerate our lead in the market, drive further innovation and strengthen the positioning of our brands while keeping our loyal and new guests at the centre of everything we do, steering us into the next phase of our growth and success,” he added.

Marriott’s BMSC leadership team for Middle East and Africa has been formed with the following seasoned hospitality professionals currently on board and a Vice President Luxury Brands soon to be announced.

Paul Dalgleish, Vice President of Sales & Distribution will be responsible for Property, Market and Area Sales Organisations as well as the Global Sales Organisation, whilst leading the Middle East and Africa Distribution Strategy.

Previously Vice President of Sales for Marriott International, Paul has played a key role in the rapid expansion of the Middle East and Africa Region, deploying new and innovative sales strategies, whilst ensuring talent development lives as a discipline priority.

Sarah Allen, Vice President of Revenue Strategy & Analysis will be responsible for Property, Market and Area Revenue Management, Remote Revenue Management Solutions and Revenue Management Analysis.

Formerly Vice President of Revenue Management, Marriott International Middle East and Africa, Sarah is a Marriott International veteran and has played a key role in moving hotels onto Marriott’s Revenue Management platforms implementing processes as well as setting up shared services across the markets to drive synergies. She was also the business leader for the integration of Protea Hotels which was acquired by Marriott International in 2014.

 

Jitendra Jain, Vice President of Digital, Loyalty and Portfolio Marketing will be responsible for the company’s award-winning Loyalty Programs, Partnerships, cross-brand marketing of Marriott International’s regional portfolio and will lead all Digital Marketing, Platforms and Products.

A Starwood veteran, Jitendra previously led the Marketing function for the former Starwood portfolio in the Middle East, where he spearheaded the transformation of marketing processes, talent and culture, cultivating a data-driven and forward-looking mindset leveraging digital, brands and loyalty.

Sandra Schulze-Potgieter, Vice President of Premium and Select Brands will be responsible for Brand Marketing and Management for Marriott International’s compelling portfolio of Premium and Select Brands and will oversee Restaurants & Bars Marketing as well as Area Field Marketing.

Sandra was previously Senior Director, Brand Marketing & eCommerce for Marriott International Middle East and Africa managing Field Marketing, Brand Marketing, Public Relations, Partnerships, Social Media, Digital as well as Loyalty. She was instrumental in positioning Marriott International’s lead in Brand Marketing in the region.

Sarah Walker Kerr, Vice President of Communications Middle East and Africa will be responsible for devising and implementing the overall Communications Strategy for Marriott International in the region, driving visibility, enhancing the perception of the company and its brands and increasing its share of voice in the media.

She will provide strategic counsel to the senior executive leadership team, managing Internal and External Communications, Crisis Communications and Reputation Management as well as Brand Communications. A seasoned communications specialist, Sarah was previously Regional Director of Public Relations Middle East, Africa, India & Japan for The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company.

Raheel Baggia, Senior Director, BMSC Planning and Services will be responsible for Integration and Change Management, Program Execution and Training. Prior to this Raheel served as Director, BMSC Consulting-Middle East and Africa.

Since joining Marriott in 2013, Raheel has been working on strategic continent projects both in his previous role supporting BMSC-Middle East and Africa as well as in Europe where he was part of the Global Operations team.

 

Sudhir Hotels Get Tripadvisor Certificates Of Excellence

The tourism sector in Uganda got a massive boost when Sudhir Ruparelia’s hotels Speke Resort Munyonyo and Munyonyo Commonwealth Resort were awarded with TripAdvisor's prestigious CertificateOfExcellence for 2017.

“We're honored to announce that we've received the TripAdvisor's prestigious CertificateOfExcellence for 2017 for the 3rd consecutive year. A massive thank you to all our customers for their amazing reviews and support,” a note sent out to customers in an email said.

Ajit Singh, Rooms Division Manager, said ‘we are always striving to become the best and to serve our guests and will continue to do so in the future. Do give us your feedback if you have stayed with us.

TripAdvisor, Inc., is an American travel website company providing hotels booking as well as reviews of travel-related content. It also includes interactive travel forums, according to Wikipedia.

Munyonyo Commonwealth Resort is a luxurious Five star hotel-resort in Kampala. The resort is located in Munyonyo, Makindye Division, in the southeastern part of Kampala, along the northern shores of Lake Victoria. The resort was commissioned in 2007 and served as the host venue of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting 2007.

Speke Resort Munyonyo is 5 star hotel in Uganda conveniently located 12 km from the capital Kampala. The hotel offers you the ultimate in luxury accommodation in Kampala and has leisure facilities together with the finest conference and business meeting location in East Africa.

Cash For Carbon: Paying Ugandans To Preserve Trees Deters Climate Change

If you have moved around Ugandan villages, you would have noticed huge chunks of forested land. These forests are paid forby a new method of fighting climate change called Paying for Ecosystem (PES).

Paying for Ecosystem paid a total of US$20,000 to 180 people in 60 Ugandan villages not to cut down trees on their land was worth the money, researchers say. By delaying carbon dioxide emissions, the project’s benefits to society were more than double its costs.

Deforestation dropped by more than half in Ugandan villages where land owners were paid 70,000 Uganda Shillings(about $28) per hectare each year if they preserved their trees, according to the study from U.S. researchers published in the journal Science on July 20, 2017.

The benefits of paying land owners to preserve forests were more than two times greater than the cost of the program when it comes to protecting forests and tackling climate change which is exacerbated by deforestation, said the two-year study.

Trees are important because they absorb lots of carbon dioxide, which is a by-product of fossil fuel burning and is the primary of driver of global warming.

Ethiopia is also among the sub-Saharan African countries taking the threat of climate change seriously and is proving to be very ambitious in its plans to tackle its causes and effects: it is one of the few countries that was rated to have a ‘sufficient INDC’ and it has developed a Climate Resilient Green Economy Strategy or CRGE to stabilize the country's economic vulnerability to climate change. With Ethiopia being proclaimed the fastest growing economy worldwide for 2017, taking into consideration adaptation and mitigation approaches will prove necessary for the sustainability of its economy.

Much like Uganda, Ethiopia has planned to build a strong green economy in the next 20 years, with an estimated cost of $150 billion. A yearly amount of, $7.5 billion in funds will be needed to implement this.

Back in Uganda, Economists who crunched the numbers on forest preservation say the model pioneered in Uganda could be expanded to other countries with large tropical forests including Brazil, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Peru, as part of the fight against global warming.

The analysis of “Payments for Ecosystems” showed its benefits to the environment were 2.4 times as large as the program costs, said the study in the journal Science. “The payments changed people’s behavior and prompted them to conserve,” said lead author Seema Jayachandran, associate professor of economics in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern University.

“And we didn’t find any evidence that they simply shifted their tree-cutting elsewhere.”

The two-year pilot in western Uganda examined the impact of offering landowners 70,000 Ugandan shillings ($28 in 2012 U.S. dollars) per year for each hectare (2.5 acres) of forest in which they left trees unperturbed. 

'Cost effective' program 

"When you think of the damage done by climate change, paying people to conserve forests is cost effective," said Northwestern University economist Seema Jayachandran, the study's lead author.

"It is a straight forward idea and the benefits are bigger than the costs," she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Researchers hope some of the billions of dollars pledged by rich countries to help poor nations respond to climate change under a United Nations agreement signed in Paris in 2015 could be used to replicate the forest protection program.

Jayachandran said researchers were able to monitor whether beneficiaries in the 121 Ugandan villages were actually preserving the forests by a combination of site visits and satellite imagery.

Most deforestation in Uganda is caused by people cutting down trees for timber or charcoal or wanting to turn forested land into farms, she said. The program included residents who formally owned their land and those who had ancestral or informal control over their properties, Jayachandran said. 

Following the Programme by Its Roots

Sixty villages were randomly selected by Innovations for Poverty action to receive incentives, and 61 were not offered any cash to save the trees. Satellite data was analysed to measure tree cover, and forest monitors conducted spot checks on enrollees’ land to hunt for any sign of recent tree-clearing.

“In the villages without the program, 9% of the tree cover that was in place at the start of the study was gone by the end of it, two years later,” said Ms. Jayachandran.

“In the villages with the PES program, there was four to five percent tree loss. In other words, there was still deforestation, but much less of it.”

Forests in Uganda provide precious habitat for endangered chimpanzees.

Between 2005 and 2010 Uganda had one of the highest rates of deforestation in the world, with 2.7% lost per year, according to background information in the article.

A full 70% of forests in Uganda are located on private land, where poor farmers cut them for timber and charcoal burning. Cleared land is also used to grow crops. After the study, villages offered the incentive preserved 13.5 more acres (5.5 more hectares) of forest than villages in the comparison group.

“This equates to 3,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide not released into the atmosphere, at a total cost of just 46 cents per ton not released over the two years of the study,” said the report.

Because the amounts of money involved are fairly small, and because most deforestation today occurs in low-income countries, researchers said the savings can be big. For instance, paying Ugandans to conserve and plant trees was an estimated 10 to 50 times more effective per dollar spent than many energy efficiency programs in the United States, the study also found.

Though this is the first experimental study of its kind, its success show not just how effective, but how cost-effective, programmes like this can be. It may also be a very cost-effective way to help meet goals such as the Paris Accord targets. 

By Boaz Opio

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