Uganda Tired Of Waiting As Rwanda Formalizes Medical Marijuana Farming

Authorities in Uganda have delayed licensing of companies intending to grow medical marijuana saying they are consulting with stakeholders on how to regulate the sector. INTERNET PHOTO Authorities in Uganda have delayed licensing of companies intending to grow medical marijuana saying they are consulting with stakeholders on how to regulate the sector.

Ugandan investors intending to participate in the commercial growing of medical marijuana or cannabis are not happy that the government has remained silent regarding opening up the business for agricultural licensing.

Their displeasure was reawakened when Rwanda on Tuesday announced that cabinet on Monday 12 October 2020 approved regulatory guidelines that provide a framework for investment in the production and processing of medical cannabis for export to growing global markets. 

Clare Akamanzi, the chief executive officer of Rwanda Development Board, said Rwanda will begin to receive applications for licences from interested investors for this high-value therapeutic crop. Such a development has eluded Ugandan companies who for the last three years have been waiting to be licensed.

The Ugandan authorities have mentioned before that they are consulting stakeholders on how they will regulate the growing of marijuana without members of the public abusing the highly addictive substance. But it seems the process is taking a little bit too long and its making interested investors uncomfortable.

In Rwanda, Akamanzi said guidelines establish quality standards, the requirements for licenses and permits, as well as strict security measures designed to prevent any illicit diversion or use of the product.

“This investment framework does no affect the legal status of cannabis consumption in Rwanda, which remains prohibited. Medical cannabis produced in Rwanda is solely for export markets,”
“Rwanda is a signatory to all relevant UN convention relating to narcotics, and will continue to ensure full compliance with international law,” Akamanzi said.

 An official at Premier Hemp, one of the companies targeting the recrutive business said they will have to yet again engage government so that the matter is addressed. The official said that with the development in Rwanda being, targeting the Rwanda market is an option they can consider.

Last modified onWednesday, 14 October 2020 20:35

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