Earth Finds

Earth Finds

South Africa Gas Potential To Be Discussed At Conference

A conference taking place in Durban from 9-11 October is set to explore South Africa’s aspirations to build an energy hub for gas cooperation with international partners along the value chain. The International Gas Cooperation Summit (IGCS) evolves from the ‘South Africa: Gas Options’ meetings held in Cape Town in 2015 & 2016.

This meeting will bring together principal government and public sector, gas developers, institutional investors and technology providers to explore how natural gas can play a greater role in South Africa’s energy mix and support the industrial and economic development goals of the country.

EnergyNet’s Anna Gorzkowska commented, “When we launched IGCS at the South Africa: Gas Options meeting last year in Cape Town, we knew that the landscape was changing and the discussion going forward would be broader to incorporate the DTI’s gas utilisation programme.

We’re therefore delighted to have got the timing of this meeting right - there is so much interest not only in the gas for power programme, but the massive infrastructure and energy projects happening as a result of those anchor discussions.

The conversation in October is also not squarely about South Africa, but its relationship with international partners and Southern Africa’s ability to develop gas based projects to electrify and empower the region.

Similarities must be drawn with the UAE 20 years ago and how they leveraged gas as the foundation of their now unimaginably rich economies. We’re looking forward to taking this discussion to the next level with our partners.”

The next opportunity

IGCS will showcase gas procurement and utilisation projects and strategies, bringing together decision makers who can lay the cornerstone of the region’s success and enable South Africa to become an energy hub to support industrial development across the region.

The agenda will focus on the global gas outlook for Southern Africa, case studies on modelling a gas economy, South Africa’s gas market in the context of the SADC region, how to accelerate gas infrastructure and the cost of diving into downstream.

A special conference for the Black Industrialists Programme with its major stakeholders will take place alongside the broader meeting, drawing on partners from the last two Gas Options meetings to continue to support the crucial objectives for both international and national investors. 

The program will be run by GE Garage engineers and instructors to enhance the students’ current capabilities whilst helping them develop new skill sets.

GE, Partners To Train Students In Advanced Manufacturing

GE, the world’s Digital Industrial Company has announced a skill development partnership programme involving its GE Lagos Garage, the Lagos State Ministry of Wealth Creation and Employment and the Lagos State Technical and Vocational Education Board (LASTVEB) aimed at developing the skills of students in the State in advanced manufacturing.

The GE Garage Advanced Manufacturing programme will involve 20 final year students and five instructors from the five Government Technical Colleges in the State taking part in an intensive one-week training that will hone their skills in advanced manufacturing.

The selected technical colleges, spread across the state and under the supervision of the Lagos State Technical and Vocational Education Board are located in Ikotun, Ikorodu, Agidingbi, Ado-Soba and Epe. The programme takes place at the LASTVEB HQ School Complex, Ikeja GRA. The programme will commence on Monday July 24 and end on Friday July 28.

During the programme, the students will be exposed to cutting-edge technology, experiencing GE’s Digital Industrial leadership in shaping modern manufacturing. They will also learn how such readily available technology can help their future businesses.

To facilitate this, GE has set up a temporary scaled version of its Garage at the venue. This comprises select equipment like 3D printers, CNC mills, among other equipment. As a guide, greater emphasis will be placed on Additive Manufacturing, 3-D printing, CAD designing, rapid prototype development, basic subtractive manufacturing using CNC mills to demonstrate mould making; and basic business knowledge. The program will be run by GE Garage engineers and instructors to enhance the students’ current capabilities whilst helping them develop new skill sets.

Speaking on the development, the Director, Communications & Public Affairs, GE Africa, Patricia Obozuwa said the initiative was aimed at promoting advanced manufacturing and technology in the modern work environment by extending the GE Lagos Garage entrepreneurship programme through LASTVEB to its colleges.

In this vein, she said, a condensed version of the current GE Garage curriculum will expose the technical college students to latest developments in advanced manufacturing, taking into consideration the student’s vocational studies exposure and their area of specialization, to ensure proper focus and impact.

Obozuwa restated GE’s commitment to empowering people through technology, pointing out that this was the very reason behind the GE Garage initiative.

“We are committed to supporting skills development in Nigeria, and across Africa. We see ourselves as partners in building a sustainable future for Africa, and we believe that partnerships such as this are necessary if we are to overcome Africa’s economic challenges,” she said.

Speaking in the same vein, the Lagos State Commissioner for Wealth Creation and Employment, Mr. Babatunde Durosinmi-Etti commended GE Nigeria for their efforts in transferring such important skills to Lagosians.

He said the collaborative initiative is in line with the ministry’s mission to promote and sustain entrepreneurship and employment through effective use of wealth creation strategies and resources by collaborating with all stakeholders.

According to him, the ministry was established in fulfilment of the promise of His Excellency, the Governor of Lagos State, Akinwunmi Ambode, to address the unemployment crisis in the State.

“It pursuit of this mandate to create employment, the ministry came up with similar initiatives like the 'Graduate Internship Programme,' a 3-month paid Internship Scheme for graduates who have been unemployed for a minimum of one year after National Youth Service Corps (NYSC). The Programme is designed to give candidates an opportunity to develop employability skills which are often vital in securing employment,” he said.

Also speaking, the Executive Secretary of the Lagos State Technical and Vocational Education Board (LASTVEB), Mrs. Omolara Erogbogbo expressed the belief that programmes such as this will go a long way in bridging the unemployment gap as well as addressing skills deficit in the country.

She highlighted the importance of vocational education to Nigeria’s socio-economic well-being, saying that the era when vocational education was believed to be undertaken by school drop-outs and pushovers was over.

 

 

 

 

 

Cash For Carbon: Paying Ugandans To Preserve Trees Deters Climate Change

If you have moved around Ugandan villages, you would have noticed huge chunks of forested land. These forests are paid forby a new method of fighting climate change called Paying for Ecosystem (PES).

Paying for Ecosystem paid a total of US$20,000 to 180 people in 60 Ugandan villages not to cut down trees on their land was worth the money, researchers say. By delaying carbon dioxide emissions, the project’s benefits to society were more than double its costs.

Deforestation dropped by more than half in Ugandan villages where land owners were paid 70,000 Uganda Shillings(about $28) per hectare each year if they preserved their trees, according to the study from U.S. researchers published in the journal Science on July 20, 2017.

The benefits of paying land owners to preserve forests were more than two times greater than the cost of the program when it comes to protecting forests and tackling climate change which is exacerbated by deforestation, said the two-year study.

Trees are important because they absorb lots of carbon dioxide, which is a by-product of fossil fuel burning and is the primary of driver of global warming.

Ethiopia is also among the sub-Saharan African countries taking the threat of climate change seriously and is proving to be very ambitious in its plans to tackle its causes and effects: it is one of the few countries that was rated to have a ‘sufficient INDC’ and it has developed a Climate Resilient Green Economy Strategy or CRGE to stabilize the country's economic vulnerability to climate change. With Ethiopia being proclaimed the fastest growing economy worldwide for 2017, taking into consideration adaptation and mitigation approaches will prove necessary for the sustainability of its economy.

Much like Uganda, Ethiopia has planned to build a strong green economy in the next 20 years, with an estimated cost of $150 billion. A yearly amount of, $7.5 billion in funds will be needed to implement this.

Back in Uganda, Economists who crunched the numbers on forest preservation say the model pioneered in Uganda could be expanded to other countries with large tropical forests including Brazil, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Peru, as part of the fight against global warming.

The analysis of “Payments for Ecosystems” showed its benefits to the environment were 2.4 times as large as the program costs, said the study in the journal Science. “The payments changed people’s behavior and prompted them to conserve,” said lead author Seema Jayachandran, associate professor of economics in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern University.

“And we didn’t find any evidence that they simply shifted their tree-cutting elsewhere.”

The two-year pilot in western Uganda examined the impact of offering landowners 70,000 Ugandan shillings ($28 in 2012 U.S. dollars) per year for each hectare (2.5 acres) of forest in which they left trees unperturbed. 

'Cost effective' program 

"When you think of the damage done by climate change, paying people to conserve forests is cost effective," said Northwestern University economist Seema Jayachandran, the study's lead author.

"It is a straight forward idea and the benefits are bigger than the costs," she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Researchers hope some of the billions of dollars pledged by rich countries to help poor nations respond to climate change under a United Nations agreement signed in Paris in 2015 could be used to replicate the forest protection program.

Jayachandran said researchers were able to monitor whether beneficiaries in the 121 Ugandan villages were actually preserving the forests by a combination of site visits and satellite imagery.

Most deforestation in Uganda is caused by people cutting down trees for timber or charcoal or wanting to turn forested land into farms, she said. The program included residents who formally owned their land and those who had ancestral or informal control over their properties, Jayachandran said. 

Following the Programme by Its Roots

Sixty villages were randomly selected by Innovations for Poverty action to receive incentives, and 61 were not offered any cash to save the trees. Satellite data was analysed to measure tree cover, and forest monitors conducted spot checks on enrollees’ land to hunt for any sign of recent tree-clearing.

“In the villages without the program, 9% of the tree cover that was in place at the start of the study was gone by the end of it, two years later,” said Ms. Jayachandran.

“In the villages with the PES program, there was four to five percent tree loss. In other words, there was still deforestation, but much less of it.”

Forests in Uganda provide precious habitat for endangered chimpanzees.

Between 2005 and 2010 Uganda had one of the highest rates of deforestation in the world, with 2.7% lost per year, according to background information in the article.

A full 70% of forests in Uganda are located on private land, where poor farmers cut them for timber and charcoal burning. Cleared land is also used to grow crops. After the study, villages offered the incentive preserved 13.5 more acres (5.5 more hectares) of forest than villages in the comparison group.

“This equates to 3,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide not released into the atmosphere, at a total cost of just 46 cents per ton not released over the two years of the study,” said the report.

Because the amounts of money involved are fairly small, and because most deforestation today occurs in low-income countries, researchers said the savings can be big. For instance, paying Ugandans to conserve and plant trees was an estimated 10 to 50 times more effective per dollar spent than many energy efficiency programs in the United States, the study also found.

Though this is the first experimental study of its kind, its success show not just how effective, but how cost-effective, programmes like this can be. It may also be a very cost-effective way to help meet goals such as the Paris Accord targets. 

By Boaz Opio

Improve Your Skills, Work Performances With These Short Courses

In Uganda, many employers don’t offer refresher courses to their employers. This is most dangerous in a dynamic society like the one we are living in now.

Skills, technology and general of doing things is fast changing therefore for anyone to remain relevant in the current workforce atmosphere must replenish themselves with new knowledge.

As an individual, you should look for opportunities to upgrade and train in fields and professions. You don’t have to take on a diploma or degree course which will take you two or four years to complete.

These short courses at Victoria University ranging from two to four weeks will do you just fine. These short courses leaves you with enough time to be at your workstation as you can undertake them on the evening or weekend programs.

Victoria University stands out as a pivot of academic excellence offering fresh and intellectually thriving environment that nurtures critical and progressive thinkers and pushes pedagogical boundaries.

The university offers a wide range of Marketable courses tailored for the market, we encourage innovation and creativity through research. Make your choice below.

 

 COURSE

Start Date

Duration

Fees

1

Department of Petroleum and Energy Studies

 

 

 

a

 Certificate in Oil and Gas Management

June 2016

7-8 Weeks/Weekends

1,400,000

b

IOSH Managing Safety Certification Course

23rd – 28th May 2016

Day programme

$1,600(+20 appln fee)

c

The Institute of Env. Management & Assesment(IEMA)

16th – 21st May 2016

Day programme

$2,520

2

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

 

 

 

a

Certificate in Strategic Human Resource Management

16th May 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

800,000

 b

Certificate in Research methods and report writing

16th May 2016 

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

800,000

c

Certificate in Data presentation and analysis

16th May 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

800,000

d

Certificate in Public Relations Analysis

16th May 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

800,000

e

Certificate in Strategic Records Management

16th May 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

800,000

f

Short course in English (Beginners, Intermediate and Advanced level.

 

23rd May 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

800,000

3

Faculty of Science and Technology

 

 

 

 a

Certificate in Computer Applications

16th May 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

800,000

b

Certificate in Mobile Applications Development

13th June 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

800,000

 c

Certificate in Computer Graphics and Animation

24th July 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

800,000

5

Faculty of Business and Management

 

 

 

a

Certificate in Accounting and Book Keeping

16th May 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

800,000

b

Certificate in Banking and Finance

6th June 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

800,000

c

Certificate in Procurement and Logistics

4th July 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

800,000

 

FACULTY OF HEALTH SCIENCES

 

 

 

 

Weekend Programme

 

 

 

a

Short Course in Public Health (SCIPH)

21st May-4th June 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

900,000

b

Resource Mobilization and Advocacy for Healthcare

21st May-11th June 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

600,000

c

Customer Care in Health

 

4th -25th June 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

500,000

d

Short Course in Public Health (SCIPH)

9th-30th July 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

800,000

e

Financing Health Care -Principles of Health Insurance

 

6-27th August 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

500,000

f

Short Course in Public Health (SCIPH)

3rd-24th September 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

800,000

g

Health Records Management and Health

 

9th-29th October 2016

5 Weeks : 5:30PM-8:30PM

500,000

 

Evening Programme

 

 

 

a

Basic Life Support (BLS)-For health care providers

9th-13th May 2016

 

600,000

b

Basic First Aid for non-health professionals

16th-20th May 2016

 

400,000

c

Basic Life Support (BLS) For Pre hospital providers

 

25th-29th July 2016

 

500,000

d

Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support(ACLS)

 

12th -23rdSeptember 2016

 

$400

e

International Crisis and Mass Disaster Management

 

3rd-14th October 2016

 

1,000,000

f

Social Media and web-based interventions for health

 

7th-11th November 2016

 

450,000

 

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